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Roof Shingles: What They Are and How They’re Made
Roofing Blog

Roof Shingles: What They Are and How They’re Made

Roof shingles are any roof covering that is made up of multiple overlapping elements. The overlap helps to prevent water from rain or snow from penetrating the roof surface. The elements-that is, the shingles-are generally flat rectangular shapes coursing up from the bottom edge of the roof up the slopes to the peak. The successive overlap covers the adjoining locations of the row below, thus preventing water from entering a sloped roof. Shingles can be made of many different materials, including wood, slate or other natural stone, metal, or composite elements, such as asphalt shingles. When the overlapping elements are ceramic or concrete, they are called tiles. Tile roofs are very popular in Europe, but less so in the United States, where the most common material is asphalt shingles. 

What Are Roof Shingles?

Roof shingles are a type of roofing material composed of multiple overlapping pieces. This design helps to prevent water from rain or snow from seeping through the roof. The shingles are generally flat, rectangular shapes laid from the bottom edge of the roof up to the peak. The overlapping arrangement covers the gaps between the rows below, ensuring water doesn’t penetrate the sloped roof. Shingles can be made from various materials, including wood, slate or other natural stones, metal, or composites like asphalt. When the elements are ceramic or concrete, they are referred to as tiles. While tile roofs are prevalent in Europe, asphalt shingles are the most common roofing material in the United States.

Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt shingles, particularly those based on fiberglass, are the most popular roofing material for residential buildings in the United States. These shingles are easy and quick to install, affordable compared to other roofing materials, and can last between twenty and fifty years, depending on the style and climate. They also come in a wide range of colors, allowing homeowners to personalize their roofs without affecting the cost.

The waterproofing and protective qualities of asphalt shingles are primarily due to long-chain petroleum hydrocarbons formed during their manufacturing.

How Are Asphalt Shingles Made?

Asphalt shingles are produced at specialized manufacturing plants across the country by various companies. These top-tier facilities receive thousands of tons of raw and processed materials daily, transforming them into high-quality roofing products with continually improving durability thanks to advancements in manufacturing technology.

The asphalt used in these plants is processed to meet stringent quality standards, resulting in strong and flexible shingles. Quarried limestone, delivered in large stones, is crushed into powder using specialized milling equipment. This limestone powder is mixed with asphalt to create a material known as filled coating.

Fiberglass serves as the core base of the shingles. Large rolls of fiberglass are coated on both sides with the filled coating at extremely high temperatures, exceeding 400 degrees Fahrenheit. After this, granules—the rough, gritty surface of the shingles—are applied. These granules are made from ceramically coated, finely mined stones, which are sized specifically for this process. The ceramic coating on the granules provides the color for the shingles, with different coatings used for each color and style.

The asphalt-coated fiberglass sheet is then fed into a press, which embeds the ceramically coated and colored granules. The material is passed over a series of rollers and sprayed with a fine mist of water to cool it down and seal the process. A strip of sealant is added to the sheet to provide additional wind resistance.

Specialized machinery at the plants then cuts the rolls into individual shingles, which are stacked and packed into bundles. These bundles are loaded onto pallets and shipped to suppliers’ warehouses across the country.

Whether you have an asphalt shingle roof or another type of roofing material, for all your roofing needs in Flagler, Palm Coast, Bunnell, Daytona Beach, St. Augustine, and Deland, call Florida’s Best Roofing Inc. at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

#RoofShingles #AsphaltShingles #RoofingMaterials #RoofMaintenance #FloridaRoofing #HomeImprovement #DaytonaBeach #StAugustine

Discover Rare and Unique Roof Shapes for Your Home
Roofing Blog

Discover Rare and Unique Roof Shapes for Your Home

This time, we will provide you with information on rare and unusual roof shapes. These unique shapes are often chosen for aesthetic reasons, heightening the impact of a structure’s style. Due to their distinctive qualities, these types of roofs are often more expensive to repair and replace since they require contractors with specialized knowledge and skills. Below, we discuss nine of these roof shapes.

Bonnet: Bonnet roofs can resemble either gambrel or mansard roofs (see our previous post for these), only in reverse. There are two panes on each side, with different slopes. Unlike gambrel and mansard roofs, bonnet roofs have steep upper panes and low-sloped bottom panes. Bonnet roofs can have two sides (like a spruced-up gable roof) or four sides (like a hip roof). These roofs are popular in specific geographic areas such as Cape Cod and the Northeast but are fairly rare elsewhere.

Saltbox: Homes with saltbox roof styles gained popularity in colonial America, but examples can still be seen today across the country and elsewhere. Saltbox roofs have two sides, like a gable shape, but what makes them unique is that these sides are not equal or symmetrical. The two sides meet at the top ridge but drop down unequal distances. One side is significantly shorter than the other, but equal in width. Most frequently, the slope also differs between the two sides, with one side usually having a much steeper slope.

Butterfly: A butterfly roof is a striking shape arising out of contemporary architecture. It is essentially the reverse of a gable roof, resulting in a shape resembling the insect that lends its name to this roofing style. While two sides rise up to a ridge in a gable roof, the two sides of a butterfly roof slope down into a central valley. This can easily lead to water retention issues and snow pile-ups in colder environments if special care is not taken to ensure positive drainage and regular snow clearance.

Sawtooth: Sawtooth roofs are similar to butterfly roofs in that they have central valleys created by two sides sloping down. However, sawtooth roofs differ in that their valleys are created by the repetition of components sloping up and then down, resulting in a facade resembling the teeth of a saw. The repeating components can be straight or curved and can vary in slope—the only requirement is that they repeat exactly several times. This style is most often seen in commercial roofing, and special care must be taken to ensure proper drainage.

Curved: Curved roofs provide a contemporary stylistic alternative to the straight lines seen in traditional roofing styles. They give a structure a modern, sleek look but require specialized skills and materials to install. Creating and designing such shapes requires experienced architects, structural engineers, and specialized contractors, making them expensive to build and maintain. However, the aesthetic possibilities are endless!

Pyramid: Almost five thousand years ago, the ancient Egyptians figured out that the pyramid shape gives stability to structures of almost any size. The balance of weight and tension makes pyramid shapes and pyramid-shaped roofs very strong. In this, pyramid roofs are closely related to hip roofs; in fact, they are a subset of hip roofs in which all four sides have equal dimensions and slope.

Jerkinhead: Also called half-hip roofs, the origin of this terminology becomes clear with a quick glance at the jerkinhead roof’s shape. The half-hip or jerkinhead roof has four sides. Two are just like those of a gable roof that meet at the top ridge. At both ends of the ridge, you will find a very short hip. This roof shape has the advantage of strength and stability provided by the hip elements and an old-world aesthetic.

Skillion: Skillion roofs are made of one sloped pane. The slope can be steep or low, closely resembling a lean-to. Homes and other structures with skillion roofs often have two or more skillion roofs at varying elevations, giving a very contemporary, modern look and providing opportunities for more windows, allowing for a brightly lit interior.

Dome: Dome roofs look exactly like you might imagine: essentially, the roof is in the shape of half of a sphere. The force distribution in these roofs, if properly constructed, makes them incredibly strong and long-lasting. This is evidenced by structures like the Pantheon in Rome, still standing after thousands of years under the original roof. Dome roofs are rarely seen in residential structures and require very specialized architects and structural engineers for their construction.

We hope this post has opened your eyes to the variety of shapes and styles available in roofing. As always, for all your roofing needs in Flagler, Palm Coast, Bunnell, Daytona Beach, and Deland, call Florida’s Best Roofing at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

#UniqueRoofShapes #RoofDesign #ArchitecturalRoofing #SpecializedRoofing #RoofingStyles #ContemporaryRoofing #RoofMaintenance

Unlocking the Secrets of Roof Shingles: Crafted for Palm Coast and Daytona Beach
Roofing Blog

Unlocking the Secrets of Roof Shingles: Crafted for Palm Coast and Daytona Beach

Roof shingles are the unsung heroes of your home’s defense against the elements, offering not just protection but also aesthetic appeal. Let’s delve into the world of roof shingles, exploring what they are, the popular asphalt variety, and how they’re expertly crafted to withstand the unique climate of Palm Coast and Daytona Beach.

Understanding Roof Shingles: Your Shield Against the Elements

Imagine roof shingles as the armor of your home, shielding it from rain, snow, and harsh sunlight. These overlapping elements, typically flat and rectangular, create a barrier that prevents water penetration into your home’s structure. Whether crafted from wood, slate, metal, or composite materials like asphalt, shingles play a vital role in maintaining the integrity of your roof.

Asphalt Shingles: The Epitome of Durability and Versatility

In the United States, asphalt shingles reign supreme as the go-to choice for residential roofing. Here’s why they’re so popular:

  • Ease of Installation: Fiberglass-based asphalt shingles are not only lightweight but also easy and quick to install, making them a preferred choice for roofing contractors.
  • Affordability: Compared to other roofing materials, asphalt shingles are budget-friendly without compromising on quality, offering a cost-effective solution for homeowners.
  • Longevity: With proper maintenance, asphalt shingles can last anywhere from twenty to fifty years, providing durable protection against the elements.
  • Variety of Colors: Asphalt shingles come in a wide array of colors, allowing homeowners to customize their roofs to match their unique aesthetic preferences without breaking the bank.

Crafting Asphalt Shingles: A Blend of Science and Precision

Ever wondered how asphalt shingles are made? Let’s take a peek behind the curtain:

  • Material Preparation: Asphalt shingles are manufactured in specialized plants across the country. Here, raw materials such as asphalt and quarried limestone are processed to meet stringent quality standards.
  • Fiberglass Base: The heart of asphalt shingles lies in the fiberglass base, which provides strength and flexibility. Rolled fiberglass sheets are coated with a mixture of asphalt and limestone powder at high temperatures.
  • Granule Application: Next, ceramically coated granules are embedded into the asphalt-coated fiberglass sheet, providing both texture and color to the shingles. The granules are meticulously selected to ensure uniformity and durability.
  • Sealing Process: To seal the shingles and enhance wind resistance, a strip of sealant is added to the sheet. Specialized machines then slice the rolls into individual shingles, which are stacked, packed, and shipped to suppliers across the country.

Ensuring Your Roof’s Integrity: Trust Florida’s Best Roofing Inc.

Whether you opt for asphalt shingles or any other roofing material, ensuring the longevity and durability of your roof is paramount. For all your roofing needs in Flagler, Palm Coast, Bunnell, Daytona Beach, and Deland, rely on Florida’s Best Roofing Inc. Call us at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate and safeguard your home with expert craftsmanship and top-notch service.

Optimizing Roof Ventilation for Palm Coast and Daytona Beach Homes
Roofing Blog

Optimizing Roof Ventilation for Palm Coast and Daytona Beach Homes

Understanding the Importance, Types, and Pros/Cons of Roof Vents

In our exploration of roofing essentials, we now delve into the critical realm of roof ventilation – a vital aspect for the longevity and efficiency of your roof. Ventilation not only extends the life of your roof but can also reduce energy consumption, ultimately saving you costs. In this detailed guide tailored for Palm Coast and Daytona Beach residents, we will discuss the significance of roof ventilation, the various types of vents, and the advantages and disadvantages associated with each.

Importance of Roof Ventilation:

A well-designed ventilation system serves as a guardian for your roof, preventing issues such as moisture buildup, poor indoor air quality, overworked air conditioning systems, and dry rot. In warmer climates like Florida, where hot and moist air can be a constant challenge, proper ventilation becomes paramount.

Ventilation systems can be categorized into two types: exhaust vents (releasing stale air) and intake vents (bringing in fresh air). Ideally, a roof should incorporate both types, although some architectural constraints may limit the inclusion of intake vents. Nonetheless, having exhaust vents alone is better than neglecting ventilation altogether.

Exhaust Vents:

  • Ridge Vents:
    • Pros: Common and highly effective, installed along the roof peak.
    • Cons: Installation requires cutting a 2-inch gap in the roof decking.
  • Off Ridge Vents:
    • Pros: Suitable for complex or short-ridged roofs.
    • Cons: Less effective than ridge vents due to the lower installation point.
  • Box Vents:
    • Pros: Also known as turtle vents, these are versatile like off ridge vents.
    • Cons: Surface area limitations compared to ridge vents.
  • Hard-Wired Powered Attic Vents:
    • Pros: Electric fans for efficient air extraction.
    • Cons: Debate over effectiveness, increased electricity costs.
  • Solar Powered Attic Vents:
    • Pros: Solar-powered, reducing electricity costs.
    • Cons: Variable effectiveness, dependency on sunlight.
  • Roof Turbines:
    • Pros: Eco-friendly, quiet operation.
    • Cons: Require multiple units for adequate ventilation, dependent on wind speed.
  • Cupola Vents:
    • Pros: Unique, aesthetically pleasing, and intake/exhaust functions.
    • Cons: Rare and expensive, but add to home aesthetics.

Intake Vents:

  • Soffit Vents:
    • Pros: Common and effective, installed on the eaves for continuous ventilation.
    • Cons: None significant, the most preferred intake vent.
  • Gable Vents:
    • Pros: Positioned on gables, offering partial intake and exhaust in horizontal cross-ventilation.
    • Cons: Less effective than vertical cross-ventilation (soffit and ridge vents).
  • Over Fascia Vents:
    • Pros: Placed at the top of the fascia board, serving where soffit venting is challenging.
    • Cons: Less effective due to reduced intake surface area compared to soffit vents.
  • Drip Edge Vents:
    • Pros: Similar to over fascia vents, integrated or added to the roof’s drip edge.
    • Cons: Intake surface area limitations, but helpful in specific scenarios.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, maintaining a well-ventilated roof is crucial for homes in Palm Coast and Daytona Beach, given the warm climate. Each type of vent comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages, and the choice depends on factors like roof architecture, size, and aesthetic preferences.

For all your roofing needs in Flagler, Palm Coast, Bunnell, Daytona Beach, and Deland, contact Florida’s Best Roofing at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate. Trust us to optimize your roof ventilation and ensure a durable and energy-efficient roofing solution for your home.”

A Comprehensive Guide to Maintenance
Roofing Blog

Unlocking Roof Longevity: A Comprehensive Guide to Maintenance

Your property’s roof is a substantial investment, serving as a crucial protector for everything beneath it. Given the significant cost and integral role it plays in structural well-being, it’s paramount to proactively maintain your business or home’s roof to ensure its prolonged lifespan.

Factors Influencing Roof Life Expectancy:

The lifespan of your roof heavily relies on the chosen roofing material. Common materials like asphalt shingles boast varying lifespans of 15 to 40 years, while durable tile roofs can endure up to 50 years with proper maintenance. However, regardless of the material, neglecting certain factors can lead to premature deterioration and unwelcome leaks.

Key Maintenance Aspects:

  • Roof Ventilation:
  • Proper roof ventilation is crucial to insulating the structure and preventing premature decay of roofing materials.
  • Inadequate ventilation can lead to extreme temperatures in the attic, causing issues like pitting, bubbling, and cracking—particularly problematic in hot and sunny regions like the South.
  • During cold months, poorly ventilated roofs trap moisture, risking damage to insulation and roof sheathing. Ensure adequate ventilation to prevent such issues.
  • Gutters:
  • Gutters and downspouts are integral components of the roofing system, preventing constant rain exposure that can lead to water damage, especially in states like Florida.
  • Install gutters if absent, and maintain them by clearing debris to prevent clogs and potential damage to the soffit and fascia system.
  • Inspect gutters biannually, especially after severe weather events, and consider using gutter-guards to minimize debris deposits.
  • Debris Removal:
  • Debris accumulation on the roof, particularly in valleys, is a common issue in areas like Palm Coast and Daytona Beach.
  • Remove pine needles, branches, leaves, and animal droppings to prevent moisture retention, water pooling, and added weight that could lead to structural damage.
  • Use a broom for debris removal, avoiding abrasive bristles or power-washers that could damage roofing materials.
  • Inspect Your Flashing:
  • Leaks often result from improperly installed or damaged flashing around skylights, chimneys, and vents.
  • Regularly check flashing for tightness and security, addressing any gaps with sealant or seeking professional assistance.
  • Moss, Algae, and Fungus:
  • Moisture-prone environments, common in humid areas, encourage the growth of moss, algae, and fungus on roofing surfaces.
  • Combat these elements by mixing equal parts bleach and water, then spraying the solution on mold and mildew.
  • Trees and Branches:
  • Proximity of trees to your property poses risks such as falling branches or the encouragement of moss and fungus growth.
  • Trim or remove trees appropriately, especially in hurricane-prone regions, to prevent potential dangers.

Additional Considerations:

The ultimate goal is preventive maintenance. Regular checks, especially after severe weather events, help catch issues early, saving time, money, and safeguarding your property. For professional assistance and a free estimate, contact Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. through our website or at 386-263-7906.

Invest in your roof’s health today to secure a resilient and lasting shield for your home.

New Roof
Roofing Blog

How a New Roof Can Increase the Value of Your Home

If you are in the process of selling or even thinking about putting your house up on the real estate market, you may be looking for ways to increase its value. One of the most valuable improvements you could make to your home is to replace its old roof with a new one. In this post we will explain how a new roof adds value to your home and the best way of going about getting your old roof replaced.

A new roof can be valuable in more ways than just the obvious. If your current roof is more than 10-15 years old, it is very prone to storm damage and highly difficult to repair. Repairs on old roofs additionally have a low life expectancy. People shopping the real estate market in Florida want to be sure that the property that they are buying is a good investment that will be stable for a long time. Florida, however, is prone to hurricanes and tropical storms which decrease property value and the stability of a home. So, new homeowners are looking for properties best able to stand up to strong storms like that. A new roof will instill confidence in shoppers since new roofs are built to the most current building codes and with the most up to date materials that provide the best protection possible against high winds and rain. Moreover, a new roof will likely not need any repairs for the upcoming years and will come with one or more warranties. All these things add value to a home.

Another thing to take into consideration is the property insurance market in Florida. You may or may not have heard about this, but due to the amount of damages from storms and flooding in recent years leading to a preponderance of claims, many property insurance companies in Florida have either left the state or went under completely. This has turned what used to be a buyer’s market (to borrow a real estate term) into a seller’s market. In the past, there were so many property insurance companies operating in Florida that a homeowner could shop around for a policy and find a fairly affordable policy quickly and with ease. The recent troubles in the property insurance market, however, have led to a state where insurance companies can raise the cost of their policies or deny coverage altogether. Frequently the coverage denials or especially high costs of insuring property are associated precisely with the state and age of the roof. It has gotten nearly to the point that homeowners and property owners seeking new policies or renewals for homes with roofs 15 or more years old have nowhere to turn to but the state run insurer, which may offer only policies with limited coverage. Any new potential homeowner would want to avoid this issue by purchasing a home with a new roof. 

So, if you are now convinced (as we suspect you are) that a roof replacement will add value to the sale price of your property, you are probably wondering how you might go about accomplishing this seemingly daunting task. The process is fairly easy. What you need to do is call a local, experienced, licensed, and insured contractor (like Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc!) for a free roof replacement estimate. Call several reputable local companies and get a series of estimates to compare prices, materials, and methods. Once you make your choice, call your chosen company and get your roof on the schedule–after filling out the necessary paperwork–as soon as possible. If you are concerned about cost, keep in mind that many companies, including Florida’s Best Roofing Inc., offer financing options. This means that you could finance your roof replacement now and then pay off your entire balance after you sell your property for a higher price than you may have previously imagined. It is important to get the process started as soon as possible. Although the roof replacement process itself is usually completed within two to three days (unless you have a tile roof), roofing companies tend to be a few weeks to a month or two out on their schedule, especially after the recent damages caused by Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole. So do not wait, and give us a call today!

If you have any questions about roofs, we would be happy to help you out. Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. is a fully licensed (CCC 1325974) and insured, local roofing contractor with decades of experience. If you are interested in roof replacement or repair and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give us a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

The Basics of Flat Roofs
Roofing Blog

What do you know about the Basics of Flat Roofs?

Flat roofs are most commonly found on commercial structures and in urban areas. While no roof should be truly flat, very very low sloped roofs, referred to as flat roofs, are different from the peaked roofs we most often discuss. Because of their low slope, water cannot quite drain as well on its own and special drainage systems must be installed. The materials used for a flat roof also differ from those that are used for peaked roofs. These materials are better able to handle water that does not drain as quickly as it would off of a peaked roof.

Flat roofs are covered with membrane roof systems. Before this is done, however, often a taper system is applied to the roof to ensure positive drainage: that water will drain away and off the roof, instead of pooling on the roof surface. A slope of no less than ¼ inch per foot is recommended for flat roofs. The taper system uses insulation sheets to create a slope carrying water from areas further away toward drains. 

There are several types of drains used for flat roofs. If the roof does not have any sort of boundary around the edges, it can be tapered to drain into gutters (preferably) around the edges. Often, however, flat roofs may have some sort of boundary around the edges which prevent drainage. This is referred to as the perimeter wall or parapet wall. In this case drains must be installed on the roof itself. In this case the water drains through pipes running through the building interior and the roof must be tapered from the edges to the drain. Multiple such drains may be required on larger roofs. 

When a roof with a parapet wall is covered by membrane, the membrane runs across the roof surface and up the wall. The corner between the wall and roof surface is softened with a cant strip. The top of the wall is flashed in such a way that the membrane stays in place and water does not enter beneath the membrane. Parapet walls also require back-up drainage systems, in case the internal drains ever get clogged. These are cut through the parapet walls two inches above the level of the primary drain and are called scuppers. They prevent water accumulating above two inches if the primary drains fail. Otherwise, the roof may collapse from the water weight. Rarely, usually on older roofs, scuppers may be installed at the deck line and act as primary drainage, in which case the roof would be tapered toward them. 

There are two classes of membrane systems: single membrane and multiple-ply membranes. Multi-ply membrane roofs are made of rolled materials bonded with an asphalt bonding agent. These are usually called built up or hot tar roofs. The first layer that sits directly on the roof deck is the base sheet. It must stand up to pulling and tugging forces which may cause wear and tear as the roof decking expands and contracts with temperature and moisture changes. The sheet that is exposed to the elements at the top is called the cap sheet. It must resist the sun and weather. The sheets in the middle between the cap and base are the ply sheets. The number of plys (interior layers) determines the quality and cost of the roof, with more being better and more expensive. Three and five ply systems are common. 

In installation, the base sheet is usually nailed to the roof decking. Adjoining strips are placed so that they overlap at the edges on every level. Hot tar is mopped over and between the plys and cap sheet, which seals the sheets together. Alternatively, in recent years self-sticking membrane sheets have begun to replace the hot tar method in some areas. There are three types of cap sheet. The first type is called mineral, and it is very similar to the coating of asphalt shingles. The second type is called smooth: this is an asphalt flood coat, which must be painted with reflective coating to prevent sun damage. The last type of cap is the aggregate finish where gravel is spread over the flood coat to protect it from the sun. As this gravel can also act as a way of weighing down the roof and holding it in place, it is called ballast. 

Next we discuss single ply membrane roof systems. The two most common are modified bitumen and elastomeric. Both of these must be fastened with screws or nails or adhesive to the roof decking. The finish must resist breakdown from sun and weather. 

Modified bitumen is made of asphalt or coal tar pitch with added plasticizers that make the material flexible. First, a base sheet is placed and fastened. Then, the modified bitumen is laid on top by one of two primary methods: hot mop (SBS) or torch down (APP). The modified bitumen either has a mineral facing or it is unfinished, in which case it must be covered with smooth stone aggregate. A coat of reflective paint is also an option. APP can be painted directly, but SBS needs a flood coat before painting. 

Elastomeric membranes are made from plastic (PVC) or synthetic rubber (EPDM). There are usually three layers that are bonded in a single sheet during the manufacturing process. If not ballasted, they must be mechanically fastened with nails or screws or glued to the decking. If ballasted, these systems are only fastened at the edges and held down by ballast. Adhesive cannot be asphalt or coal tar pitch, as it breaks down the material. Insulation cushions PVC and is covered by a fabric or paper slip sheet to prevent damage as the plastic shifts. Both systems are glued or fastened at the seams. While EPDM uses chemical glue, PVC is heated-welded by a special machine. Smooth stone ballast may be placed on top of either PVC or EPDM systems.

If you have any questions about flat roofs or need any work done on your roof in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

What is Below Shingles on a Roof?
Roofing Blog

Do you want to know what is Below Shingles on a Roof?

When you look at a roof what you notice first is its shape and the material, most often asphalt shingles, that covers it. Upon a closer look you may notice some vents and pipes, but besides that it is really impossible to see what the roof is really made of. Unless you see a roof being replaced or a new roof being installed, you may never know how many layers and types of materials are hidden underneath the shingles and really make up the roof beyond the visible materials.

In fact, there are several layers beneath the shingles that work to create the roof shape, support it, regulate temperature, insulate your home, and block out moisture. Knowing about what really makes up a roof can help you understand how it functions, how it can be damaged or protected, and help you in dealing with roofing issues on your property in the future.

 

Layers Under Roof Covering

Let’s go over the layers that make up a roof, starting from the bottom and heading up.

 

The Frame

The frame of the home is what gives it its shape and defines its boundaries. The frame of the roof creates its shape and the support for all covering material. The frames of modern homes are typically made of a series of wood trusses manufactured to the specifications of a particular blueprint or home design. Occasionally, roofs are built completely on-site with wooden beams cut to appropriate rafter size and put together on the structure. It is important to have an idea of what the finished roof will look like when creating the frame since frames for certain roofing materials, like clay or concrete tile or slate, require additional reinforcing in the frame to hold up their weight. 

 

Insulation

Insulation in a house helps to regulate the internal temperature of a structure and prevent its fluctuations during weather changes. It also aids in reducing the use and cost of heaters and air conditioners. In a finished attic, the insulation is placed between the rafters of the roof’s frame. In an unfinished attic, the insulation can usually be found on the attic floor. 

 

The Roof Deck

The roof deck is nailed on top of the roof frame. It is made of wooden boards, usually either plywood or another engineered wood product such as oriented particle board (OSB). This creates the roof’s surface on top of the trusses. Holes are cut in the roof deck at appropriate areas where roofing vents will eventually be installed.

 

Water Shield

A waterproof barrier or membrane that is designed to prevent build up of moisture or protect areas that are particularly susceptible to water damage is laid down next. This is typically a peel-and-stick membrane that is used to line all valleys on the roof and, in climates that have ice or snow in the winter, the perimeter around the eaves. The peel-and-stick membrane attaches directly to the roof’s deck.

 

Underlayment

Next, and directly below the roof covering, is the underlayment. There are several different kinds of underlayment, which we will go over below since they serve as an integral part of the roof, particularly in preventing water from reaching the roof deck and then causing leaks. Underlayment is usually made of fiberglass paper or felt, and it covers the entire roof. Depending on the type of underlayment, it is either nailed to the deck or sticks directly to it if it is self-adhesive. 

Underlayment is either water-resistant or waterproof. There are three kinds of underlayment: asphalt-saturated felt, non-bitumen synthetic underlayment, or rubberized asphalt underlayment.

 

Asphalt-Saturated Felt

Until about 15-20 years ago, this was the most common kind of underlayment. It is water-resistant and nailed down to the roof. It is commonly called tar or felt paper and can vary in thickness. It consists of a base material (wood, cellulose, polyester, or fiberglass) which is soaked in a protective coat of asphalt (bitumen) or a similar material.

 

Synthetic Underlayment

This is presently the most common type of underlayment used by contractors, although in hurricane-prone central Florida it is quickly being replaced by the hardier rubberized asphalt (discussed below). Compared to felt paper (above) synthetic underlayment has increased durability. Fiberglass is added when the synthetic material is coated in asphalt, resulting in increased resistance to tears and punctures. Still, synthetic underlayment is water-resistant and must be nailed down to the roof deck.

 

Rubberized Asphalt

This is the most expensive type of underlayment, which is presently growing in popularity, although it leads to a higher cost of roof replacement. Its expense comes from a higher amount of rubber and asphalt polymers in production, which contribute to its strength. This underlayment comes with an adhesive on one side. When the covering is peeled away this adhesive sticks directly to the roof deck and creates a waterproof seal, as no nailing is required. It is also called peel-and-seal. 

Once the chosen underlayment is in place, the roof covering is added, beginning with the shingle starter strip and drip-edge at the eaves, the vents and flashing in their designated spaces, and shingles (or other chosen covering material) across the entire roof. 

If you have any questions about roof underlayment or need any work done on your roof in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

home-insurance
Roofing Blog

Will my home insurance cover repairs to my roof?

As a homeowner you have a home insurance policy to help protect your home from damages and help bring it back to its original condition after such damages occur. Home insurance policies provide coverage for certain events, called perils, and often exclude others: these are all specified in your home insurance policy. 

When it comes to roofs, home insurance policies typically cover damages caused by weather. Most frequently, this involves wind or hail damage, although other perils like lightning strikes, tornadoes, and fire are also covered. Indirect damage is also covered, for instance, in the case that wind downs a tree which falls on the roof of a house. On the other hand, some kinds of roof damage are specifically not covered by home insurance. This includes improper installation of roof components, material failure due to manufacturing defects, and normal wear and tear. Wear and tear occurs as a roof ages and affects different materials in different ways. For example, shingles become brittle and metal corrodes. This is why roofs have a limited life expectancy which is typically 15-25 years for a shingle roof and 40-50 years for a tile roof.

Another important part of insurance coverage in places like Florida, and along the eastern seaboard in general, is named storms. Damage caused by named tropical storms and hurricanes is covered in a particular way. Every insurance policy includes a deductible–an amount that the insurance company expects the policy holder to pay out of pocket. This is most frequently $500 or $1000, but can be higher. Damage caused by named storms, however, usually carries its own deductible, separate from all other perils, like a typical windstorm or hail storm. It is referred to as the “hurricane deductible” and is usually 2% of the Dwelling A limit on a policy. The hurricane deductible is always clearly stated in a policy alongside the other perils deductible.

In the case that your roof is damaged by one of the events outlined above and listed in your policy, your insurance will help you pay for your roof repair or even a roof replacement if the damage is extensive or if the roof cannot be effectively repaired, in compliance with state building codes, without replacing the whole roof. To get this process started you will need to call your home insurance company and file a claim as soon as the damage occurs. In Florida, state law says that a policyholder has three years from the date of loss, the insurance term for the date on which damage occurs, to file a claim. It is best, however, to file your claim as soon as you notice damage to your roof in order to prevent further damage in the form of leaks.

Interior leaks are the most obvious evidence of roof damage, but it is best to catch roof damage before these occur. This saves cost down the road and prevents situations that cause homeowners stress and anxiety. It is also important to keep in mind that if interior leaks do occur, you must tell your insurance company about these when calling in the claim, as this damage is also covered under home insurance policies. After the claim is called in, the insurance company will send out an adjuster to assess the damage to both the roof and the interior, if there is any. It is important to set an appointment with the adjuster at a time when someone can meet them, so that the adjuster is able to enter the home and effectively document the evidence of the damage. This is crucial since the insurance company will not pay to repair damage unless they have documentation. 

It is frequently difficult or impossible to see roof damage if it has not progressed up to an interior leak. Things like missing or creased shingles and loose or cracked tiles go unnoticed by most homeowners since people do not often spend much time on top of their roofs. Furthermore, even if a homeowner notes evidence of roof damage, he or she will have a hard time pinpointing the exact date on which this damage occurred, unless it follows directly after a hurricane or tropical storm. And yet, this date is crucial when reporting a claim, since claims with incorrect dates of loss are typically denied. 

So how do you determine if your roof has damage covered under your insurance policy and the date on which this damage occurred? The easiest and most reliable way is to call a professional. A roofing contractor will be able to identify damage on your roof and pinpoint its cause. At Florida’s Best Roofing, we will inspect your roof for free and advise you whether or not the damage to your home will be covered by your insurance policy. We will also help you figure out the date on which it occurred based on its age and tracked weather patterns in your area. We will also meet with your insurance adjuster to make sure that all evidence of damage is noted. Florida’s Best Roofing services all your roofing needs in Palm Coast and offers free estimates.

Call us today at 386-263-7906.

Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc is a Palm Coast-based roofing contractor, providing professional roofing services in Flagler and Volusia County Areas.

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