(386) 263-7906 floridasbestroofing@gmail.com
What is Below Shingles on a Roof?
Roofing Blog

Do you want to know what is Below Shingles on a Roof?

When you look at a roof what you notice first is its shape and the material, most often asphalt shingles, that covers it. Upon a closer look you may notice some vents and pipes, but besides that it is really impossible to see what the roof is really made of. Unless you see a roof being replaced or a new roof being installed, you may never know how many layers and types of materials are hidden underneath the shingles and really make up the roof beyond the visible materials.

In fact, there are several layers beneath the shingles that work to create the roof shape, support it, regulate temperature, insulate your home, and block out moisture. Knowing about what really makes up a roof can help you understand how it functions, how it can be damaged or protected, and help you in dealing with roofing issues on your property in the future.

 

Layers Under Roof Covering

Let’s go over the layers that make up a roof, starting from the bottom and heading up.

 

The Frame

The frame of the home is what gives it its shape and defines its boundaries. The frame of the roof creates its shape and the support for all covering material. The frames of modern homes are typically made of a series of wood trusses manufactured to the specifications of a particular blueprint or home design. Occasionally, roofs are built completely on-site with wooden beams cut to appropriate rafter size and put together on the structure. It is important to have an idea of what the finished roof will look like when creating the frame since frames for certain roofing materials, like clay or concrete tile or slate, require additional reinforcing in the frame to hold up their weight. 

 

Insulation

Insulation in a house helps to regulate the internal temperature of a structure and prevent its fluctuations during weather changes. It also aids in reducing the use and cost of heaters and air conditioners. In a finished attic, the insulation is placed between the rafters of the roof’s frame. In an unfinished attic, the insulation can usually be found on the attic floor. 

 

The Roof Deck

The roof deck is nailed on top of the roof frame. It is made of wooden boards, usually either plywood or another engineered wood product such as oriented particle board (OSB). This creates the roof’s surface on top of the trusses. Holes are cut in the roof deck at appropriate areas where roofing vents will eventually be installed.

 

Water Shield

A waterproof barrier or membrane that is designed to prevent build up of moisture or protect areas that are particularly susceptible to water damage is laid down next. This is typically a peel-and-stick membrane that is used to line all valleys on the roof and, in climates that have ice or snow in the winter, the perimeter around the eaves. The peel-and-stick membrane attaches directly to the roof’s deck.

 

Underlayment

Next, and directly below the roof covering, is the underlayment. There are several different kinds of underlayment, which we will go over below since they serve as an integral part of the roof, particularly in preventing water from reaching the roof deck and then causing leaks. Underlayment is usually made of fiberglass paper or felt, and it covers the entire roof. Depending on the type of underlayment, it is either nailed to the deck or sticks directly to it if it is self-adhesive. 

Underlayment is either water-resistant or waterproof. There are three kinds of underlayment: asphalt-saturated felt, non-bitumen synthetic underlayment, or rubberized asphalt underlayment.

 

Asphalt-Saturated Felt

Until about 15-20 years ago, this was the most common kind of underlayment. It is water-resistant and nailed down to the roof. It is commonly called tar or felt paper and can vary in thickness. It consists of a base material (wood, cellulose, polyester, or fiberglass) which is soaked in a protective coat of asphalt (bitumen) or a similar material.

 

Synthetic Underlayment

This is presently the most common type of underlayment used by contractors, although in hurricane-prone central Florida it is quickly being replaced by the hardier rubberized asphalt (discussed below). Compared to felt paper (above) synthetic underlayment has increased durability. Fiberglass is added when the synthetic material is coated in asphalt, resulting in increased resistance to tears and punctures. Still, synthetic underlayment is water-resistant and must be nailed down to the roof deck.

 

Rubberized Asphalt

This is the most expensive type of underlayment, which is presently growing in popularity, although it leads to a higher cost of roof replacement. Its expense comes from a higher amount of rubber and asphalt polymers in production, which contribute to its strength. This underlayment comes with an adhesive on one side. When the covering is peeled away this adhesive sticks directly to the roof deck and creates a waterproof seal, as no nailing is required. It is also called peel-and-seal. 

Once the chosen underlayment is in place, the roof covering is added, beginning with the shingle starter strip and drip-edge at the eaves, the vents and flashing in their designated spaces, and shingles (or other chosen covering material) across the entire roof. 

If you have any questions about roof underlayment or need any work done on your roof in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

Warranty Can I Get
Roofing Blog

What Kind of Warranty Can I Get for a New Roof?

When you replace your roof with a new one you make a big investment, and naturally you want that investment to be protected. Large projects like roof replacement come with warranties. It is important to find out what kind of warranties are out there so you can make the best choices for yourself, your home, and your investment. For this reason, you should always look into the warranties offered by both material manufacturers and contractors before selecting a material for your new roof and the contractor who will install it. 

Whether you are purchasing a completely new home with a new roof or you are replacing your existing roof with a new one, your roof will likely come with a warranty (and if it does not, you may want to look into getting a second or third opinion from a different contractor). Roof related warranties are generally split into two types, and both of these types of warranty should come with every new roof or roof replacement. The first is the manufacturer’s warranty, and the second is the contractor’s warranty. They cover two different aspects of the roof: the materials used and the way they are installed. We will look deeper into both aspects below.

 

Manufacturers’ Warranties

A manufacturer’s warranty is so named because it is guaranteed and provided by the manufacturer of the material used to cover the new or replaced roof. As we have covered in previous posts, there are many different kinds of roofing material, the most common in central Florida being asphalt shingles, followed by tile and metal roofing materials. All of these come with different warranty periods, guaranteed by their manufacturers. 

Asphalt shingles warranties vary in length by type of shingle. Just a decade or two ago the principal type of asphalt shingle in use was the 3-tab shingle, which carried a warranty of 15-25 years depending on the manufacturer. Shingle manufacturing technology, however, is constantly improving. Nowadays, 3-tab shingles, the cheapest kind of shingle, carry a warranty of 30 years. But these are no longer the most common type of shingle used. Instead, we almost always use architectural shingles, which have an improved aesthetic and quality. These shingles come with a 40 year manufacturer’s warranty for the most basic sort and a limited lifetime warranty for the average grade. This warranty essentially translates into 50 years. The highest quality architectural shingles, also the most expensive sort, can carry warranties equal to the lifetime of the roof. Manufacturer’s warranties for asphalt shingles are typically transferable once in the case of property exchanging hands.

Limited lifetime manufacturer’s warranties are also typically guaranteed by tile and metal roofing material manufacturers. A typical explanation of the limited lifetime warranty in these cases is that they are in effect as long as the home remains owned by the same owner who replaced the roof (or purchased the home with a new roof). The good news is that if the home transfers ownership (that is, if you sell your house), the warranty is transferable! However, once transferred, the warranty remains in effect for a limited period, such as 40 or 50 years. 

Due to recent technological innovations, manufacturer’s asphalt shingle warranties are now typically equal in length to tile and metal roofing material manufacturer’s warranties. All of these manufacturers’ warranties cover specifically problems that may arise in the roofing material resulting from defects in the manufacturing process. Some examples of these include rapid granule or color loss in shingles (also color change). Splitting and cracking are signs of defects in metal or tile. These are only covered if the cause is manufacturing defect, not poor installation technique or external causes (such as a tree falling down on the roof). Weather events, such as wind or hail, that can damage new and replaced roofs are sometimes nowadays covered under manufacturers’ warranties, but with limitations in factors like wind speed. For example, the architectural shingles that we use at Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. come with a manufacturer’s warranty against winds of up to 130 miles per hour. It is important to remember, however, that weather damages like wind and hail are also typically covered by property insurance policies, and losses can be recouped by filing a claim with your home insurance company. For more details on this, see our earlier post on this topic.

Another thing to keep in mind about manufacturers’ warranties is that it is important to register your new roof with the manufacturer of the roofing material. This will put the warranty into effect. If you have questions about how to do this, consult your contractor, as they likely deal with this process on a daily basis. 

 

Labor or Workmanship Warranties

This is the other side of the warranty coin. While manufacturers’ warranties cover new roof or roof replacement materials, labor or workmanship warranties cover installation. These warranties are provided by the contractor who replaces your roof or puts the roof on a new home. Their length varies by contractor, from 3 to 5 to 10 years, with ten years being the most common. Since it is the contractor who provides the warranty, it is typically only effective if the same contractor is called in to deal with a problem that may arise.

Contractors’ warranties usually cover the labor and material cost involved in repairing a roof under warranty if the repairs are made necessary by problems arising from errors made in the installation process when the new roof was installed or replaced. In the case that you have a roof under a labor or workmanship warranty and you notice a problem or leak, you should call the contractor who guaranteed the warranty to assess the damage and make the repairs. It is also important to note that some labor warranties do not cover material costs associated with repairs, so it is important to clarify what type of warranty you will be getting before signing a contract. 

We at Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. offer a 10 year labor warranty on all our roof replacements. If you have any questions about roofing warranties or any other roofing needs in Flagler, Volusia, or St. Johns counties please call us at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

Roof Styles & Shapes
Roofing Blog

Roof Styles & Shapes

Have you ever wondered about why your roof is shaped the way it is? Why is it different from a neighbor’s roof? Whether those differences matter and where they come from? Well here you’ll find the answers. Below we look at some of the most popular roof shapes and their unique aspects.

Gable Roofs

Gable roofs are the most common type of roofing style installed today. They have a simple and classic look, giving the roof a triangular shape when viewed from the front or the back. This type of roof rises up from the eave to the ridge on one side and then goes down from the ridge to the eave on the other. 

Gable roofs can look very different from one house to another because they vary in slope. Low sloped gable roofs give a structure a flatter look while high sloped roofs are steeper and taller. As with most roofing styles, gable roofs also vary because most modern structures do not have just one roof, but instead a main roof with multiple sub-roofs. The ways that the main roof and sub-roofs are combined allows for much versatility.  

Hip Roofs

Hip roofs are the second most common style of roof for modern residential structures in America today. They have both advantages and disadvantages in comparison to gable roofs. In fact, it is also quite common to see combinations with a main hip roof and gable sub-roofs, or the other way around.

Hip roofs’ main advantage is in their strength. Unlike a gable roof, which only has two sides, a hip roof goes down from the ridge to the eave on all four sides. The intersection of all four sides at the top allows for greater stability and balance.

The downside is that hip roofs can be more expensive to replace, because they have a greater surface area. This is, of course, in a comparison of two houses of the same size.

Like gable roofs, hip roofs can look very different from one house to the next because they can also vary in slope, from relatively flat to steep. In any case, a house with a hip roof and only hip sub-roofs has a square look, since it lacks the triangle created by the gable.

Gambrel Roofs

Gambrel roofs have a very distinct aesthetic, similar to Mansard roofs, discussed below. They were very popular in past centuries and can be found particularly in the Northeast. They are also sometimes called Dutch roofs. 

A gambrel is similar to a gable in that both roofing styles only slope on two sides of the house, leaving the other two sides with siding or stucco going up to the roof pitch. The difference in gable and gambrel is that the latter has two panels, with different slopes, on each side. The two panels that join up at the ridge usually have a lower slope, and then two further panels are attached to these with a steeper slope. This gives the house an overall curved look, without actually having a rounded roof.

Just like gable and hip roofs, gambrel roofs are most often covered with asphalt shingles, although metal roof covering is also an option.

Mansard Roofs

In a way, a mansard roof is to a gambrel as a hip roof is to a gable. Basically, a mansard is a gambrel roof, but with four sides. Each of the four sides has two panels, with the top four panels, which intersect at the top ridge, having a fairly low slope, and the attached lower four panels having a very steep slope. 

Mansard roofs can have an overall boxy look, but this is mitigated by certain factors. For one, they often have dormers, windows with small gable shaped roof coverings, that jut out from the steep sections of the roof. The dormers lend this French style shape a certain amount of elegance, making it very popular in complex, historic homes. Due to the steep slope of the secondary panels, mansard roofs also allow for a great deal of attic space, or even the top story to be housed within the slopes of the roof!

The disadvantage of a mansard roof is its expense. This results from the complexity of the roof shape, the high slope, the high surface area, and often the delicate nature of working on historic structures. Furthermore, the roofing materials for mansard roofs can be more expensive. Traditionally, mansard roofs were covered with slate, the most expensive and longest lasting type of roofing material. In the modern day, cheaper asphalt shingles are more commonly used, but this can pose a problem of its own. Shingles are great for the steep panels of a roof, but the four low-sloped mansard panels are better suited for flat roofing materials. This results in a choice between a properly covered un-matched roof, or a matched fully shingle roof, which is not as effective in the low-sloped areas.

Flat Roofs

Flat roofs are most common in commercial roofing, but can also be seen on some residential structures, particularly in urban areas.

Flat roofs should never be completely flat, but their slope is so close to negligible that it is essentially not noticeable by the naked eye. Due to this, to prevent water retention, flat roofs require well functioning drainage systems, as well as special roofing materials that stand up to frequent and consistent water exposure better than standard asphalt shingles or tile.

Flat roofing materials must stand up to water exposure, beating from rain, and being walked on. They must be completely watertight, as leaks in flat roofs are very difficult to find and even more difficult to repair effectively.

These are the most commonly used flat roof materials: PVC membrane, TPO membrane, EPDM rubber membrane, rolled roofing, and gravel and tar.

In the Flagler, Deland, and Daytona Beach area hip and gable are the most common roofs in residential construction and flat roofs in commercial. Whatever your roofing style, if you have any roofing concerns call Florida’s Best Roofing at (386) 263-7906!

home-insurance
Roofing Blog

Will my home insurance cover repairs to my roof?

As a homeowner you have a home insurance policy to help protect your home from damages and help bring it back to its original condition after such damages occur. Home insurance policies provide coverage for certain events, called perils, and often exclude others: these are all specified in your home insurance policy. 

When it comes to roofs, home insurance policies typically cover damages caused by weather. Most frequently, this involves wind or hail damage, although other perils like lightning strikes, tornadoes, and fire are also covered. Indirect damage is also covered, for instance, in the case that wind downs a tree which falls on the roof of a house. On the other hand, some kinds of roof damage are specifically not covered by home insurance. This includes improper installation of roof components, material failure due to manufacturing defects, and normal wear and tear. Wear and tear occurs as a roof ages and affects different materials in different ways. For example, shingles become brittle and metal corrodes. This is why roofs have a limited life expectancy which is typically 15-25 years for a shingle roof and 40-50 years for a tile roof.

Another important part of insurance coverage in places like Florida, and along the eastern seaboard in general, is named storms. Damage caused by named tropical storms and hurricanes is covered in a particular way. Every insurance policy includes a deductible–an amount that the insurance company expects the policy holder to pay out of pocket. This is most frequently $500 or $1000, but can be higher. Damage caused by named storms, however, usually carries its own deductible, separate from all other perils, like a typical windstorm or hail storm. It is referred to as the “hurricane deductible” and is usually 2% of the Dwelling A limit on a policy. The hurricane deductible is always clearly stated in a policy alongside the other perils deductible.

In the case that your roof is damaged by one of the events outlined above and listed in your policy, your insurance will help you pay for your roof repair or even a roof replacement if the damage is extensive or if the roof cannot be effectively repaired, in compliance with state building codes, without replacing the whole roof. To get this process started you will need to call your home insurance company and file a claim as soon as the damage occurs. In Florida, state law says that a policyholder has three years from the date of loss, the insurance term for the date on which damage occurs, to file a claim. It is best, however, to file your claim as soon as you notice damage to your roof in order to prevent further damage in the form of leaks.

Interior leaks are the most obvious evidence of roof damage, but it is best to catch roof damage before these occur. This saves cost down the road and prevents situations that cause homeowners stress and anxiety. It is also important to keep in mind that if interior leaks do occur, you must tell your insurance company about these when calling in the claim, as this damage is also covered under home insurance policies. After the claim is called in, the insurance company will send out an adjuster to assess the damage to both the roof and the interior, if there is any. It is important to set an appointment with the adjuster at a time when someone can meet them, so that the adjuster is able to enter the home and effectively document the evidence of the damage. This is crucial since the insurance company will not pay to repair damage unless they have documentation. 

It is frequently difficult or impossible to see roof damage if it has not progressed up to an interior leak. Things like missing or creased shingles and loose or cracked tiles go unnoticed by most homeowners since people do not often spend much time on top of their roofs. Furthermore, even if a homeowner notes evidence of roof damage, he or she will have a hard time pinpointing the exact date on which this damage occurred, unless it follows directly after a hurricane or tropical storm. And yet, this date is crucial when reporting a claim, since claims with incorrect dates of loss are typically denied. 

So how do you determine if your roof has damage covered under your insurance policy and the date on which this damage occurred? The easiest and most reliable way is to call a professional. A roofing contractor will be able to identify damage on your roof and pinpoint its cause. At Florida’s Best Roofing, we will inspect your roof for free and advise you whether or not the damage to your home will be covered by your insurance policy. We will also help you figure out the date on which it occurred based on its age and tracked weather patterns in your area. We will also meet with your insurance adjuster to make sure that all evidence of damage is noted. Florida’s Best Roofing services all your roofing needs in Palm Coast and offers free estimates.

Call us today at 386-263-7906.

Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc is a Palm Coast-based roofing contractor, providing professional roofing services in Flagler and Volusia County Areas.

Newsletter

We promise not to spam!