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Roofing Blog

Summer Fun: Tales of Roofing Across Time Part I

Nowadays roofing construction and the roofing business can seem mundane and often quite a hassle for those who have to deal with roof repairs or roof replacement. While that, in fact, may have always been the case throughout history, roofing does play a key role in a few tales across time, from mythological, to historical, to mundane. In the next few posts we will look at interesting ways that roofing has come up in ancient mythology and history while contextualizing these snapshots for those who may not be quite so familiar with tales from antiquity.

 

The Odyssey

 One of the world’s earliest works of literature is an epic poem in ancient Greek attributed to the fabled bard Homer. It is unclear whether an actual person named Homer existed who was associated with the poetry attributed to him, but two epic poems do survive from around 800-700 BCE that become foundational for world literature, particularly in Europe: the Iliad and the Odyssey. These two poems were part of what is called the Trojan cycle, which included several other narrative poems that no longer survive. They narrate events surrounding the Trojan War, a major event in Greek mythology. While the Iliad is a narrative of events surrounding the tenth year of the war, focusing on Achilles, the greatest of the Greek heroes, the Odyssey is a story of another hero’s wandering and return home after the war. Here we will address one particular, and very famous, episode in the Odyssey that involves roofs.

 

Aeaea

 In book 10 (of 24) in the Odyssey, the main character, Odysseus, tells a story about his travels when he is addressing the Phaeacians, a people who welcomed him toward the end of his 10 years of travels (during which he was trying to make it home after fighting on the Greek side in the Trojan War and being instrumental in capturing the city of Troy—he was the architect behind the plan of the Trojan horse). Participating in the ancient, revered art of storytelling, a major theme in the Odyssey, Odysseus tells about how in his travels he and his men accidentally landed on the island of Aeaea, ruled by Circe, after a series of unfortunate events that involved the likes of the Cyclops and the Laestrygonians—a mythological race of boulder wielding cannibals. In Greek mythology Circe was the daughter of the god Apollo and a witch. Odysseus sent half his men to explore the island, and Circe promptly turned them into pigs by feeding them magic food, allowing one to report back to Odysseus (a folktale motif—don’t eat food in mysterious places ruled by mysterious women). Odysseus sets out to rescue his men, and he is assisted by the god Hermes, who gives him a special flower (moly) that keeps Circe’s magical food from transforming Odysseus into a pig. When Odysseus confronts Circe, she tries to turn him into a pig anyway, but he threatens her with his sword, and she sleeps with him instead (that’s definitely how that works). Circe turns the pigs back into men, and Odysseus spends a year with her. They have a son, Telegonus, who in some versions of the myth (not the Odyssey) decades later kills his father. After a year, Odysseus decides to leave, but Circe tells him to go check out the Underworld first.

 

Elpenor

 The night before the journey, Odysseus and his men are invited to a banquet by Circe, who now serves as their hostess. During this banquet, using her witchy powers, Circe advises Odysseus that in order to find his way back home to Ithaca (his goal), he must consult the famed prophet Tiresias. Unfortunately, at this point Tiresias is dead. Thus, Circe instructs Odysseus on how to reach a gateway to the Greek underworld, Hades, and how there to summon the shades of the dead, particularly Tiresias, in order to get his advice. Odysseus plans to set out on this fact-finding mission immediately the next morning. Yet, also during this banquet, Odysseus’ youngest comrade, Elpenor, gets very drunk and decides to spend the night sleeping on the roof of Circe’s house.

 The next morning, setting out for their journey to the Underworld, Odysseus and his men notice that Elpenor is missing. Deciding that they do not have the time to search for him, they board their ship and sail to the west (the general direction of the underworld in ancient mythology across the world). Having reached the most western lands, beyond the limits of the world (in ancient Greek mythological understanding), Odysseus proceeds to dig a giant pit to the underworld with his sword—doubtless the best instrument for this—and then he conducts the ritual (involving libations of water, milk and honey, wine, and then animal blood) to summon the shades of the dead, including Tiresias.

 Before he can speak to Tiresias, however, Odysseus is confronted by the shade of Elpenor. After a short conversation, Odysseus learns from Elpenor that unbeknownst to the rest of the men, Elpenor was not just missing, but dead. He woke up on the roof the morning after the banquet and, forgetting where he was, in his confusion, fell off the roof, breaking his neck. Elpenor begs Odysseus to return to Aeaea and bury his body, since otherwise he cannot enter the underworld and proceed with the afterlife. Odysseus agrees to do so, and in fact does just that after returning to Aeaea following his conversation with the other shades of the underworld, allowing Elpenor’s shade to pass into the underworld.

 

 If you are interested in ancient tales, stay tuned for the next post!

 If you have any questions about roofs, we would be happy to help you out. Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. is a fully licensed (CCC 1325974) and insured, local roofing contractor with decades of experience. If you are interested in roof replacement or repair and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give us a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

Insurance Claims for Roof Damage
Roofing Blog

Insurance Claims for Roof Damage: 5 Tips

When your home or property gets damaged by a storm or other natural event, you want to be confident that repairs and restorations will be covered by your property insurance. After all, this is why you pay your yearly insurance premiums to avoid hassle when your property sustains damage. For those unfamiliar with the insurance claims process, however, it can pose some challenges and present frustrations. This is why we are here to help you get prepared and make your way through filing a roof damage claim and getting your roof back to its original undamaged state. Here are five tips for dealing with the insurance and claims process that will help to make it quick and easy.

 

  1. Know your policy

While most people are content simply knowing that they have an insurance policy and leave the details to their insurance agent, it is essential that you are familiar with certain parts of your policy. The first is the policy period. Insurance will only cover damage sustained during the period that the policy is active, which can be found under the heading “policy period” at the front of the policy. Make sure that you renew your policy before any deadlines so that it stays current and you have coverage at all times.

Regarding roofs, it is also important to watch out for policy endorsements that may limit roof coverage. A list of endorsements can be found in the Declarations Page section of each property insurance policy. Some insurance companies are adding an Actual Cash Value roof assessment endorsement. This may not seem like a big deal normally, but when it comes to wind or hail storm coverage for the roof, it results in a depreciated payment for roof repair or replacement. This typically amounts to an insurance payment that is only a percentage of what it will actually cost you to repair or replace the roof (somewhere around fifty percent). While ACV coverage endorsements can lower your premiums, they will bite back with significant out of pocket costs in the event of storm damage.

 

  1. File your claim in a timely manner

In Florida, you have, by law, two years from the day that damage occurred to file a claim. While this timeline gives you significant leeway, it is always best to file the claim as soon as you notice the damage and as close as possible to the date of loss (the date of the storm). This will get the process started and prevent any further damage from occurring, which may increase your costs in the long run. Additionally, insurance policies typically require the policyholder to take any possible measures to mitigate damages while the claims process is happening. This means that if there is a delay in the filing of a claim, and a leak resulting from a storm damaged roof worsens, then an insurance company may refuse to pay for any interior damages or mold issues resulting from the worsening of that leak. Avoid extensive interior damages and repairs liability by filing the claim as soon as possible.

 

  1. Maintain open lines of communication with your insurance company

Throughout the claims process you will be in extended communications with your insurance company, from filing the claim, to getting in touch with your adjuster, to scheduling an inspection, to receiving their acknowledgement of the filing, to receiving their estimate and settlement letter, and so on. This process will be much quicker and easier if you have open lines of communication with your insurer. Make sure that your property insurance company always has your updated physical address, an updated phone number, and ideally an updated email address which you check frequently. You may also want to sign up for text/SMS alerts. While your insurer will mail you physical copies of their correspondence letters if necessary, the process will proceed much faster if this can be done electronically. 

 

  1. Keep organized and document the process

Your adjuster will conduct an inspection of your property after you file a claim. It is always good, however, to have your own documentation as well. Make sure to photograph any property damage and note the cost of any damaged or destroyed items. Note also the dates of damage and dates of the photographs. Keep a running list of anyone with whom you speak about the claim (adjusters, inspectors, contractors, etc). On this list, note the date and time of conversation, the name, title, and contact information of the person with whom you spoke, and a summary of what was discussed. While you may not need any of this, it will make your life much easier if any problems do arise.

 

  1. Consult a professional in case of difficulties

When starting a claims process, it is always good to talk to someone who has been through it before. This may be a friend, family member, or neighbor who can give you an idea of what to expect. In the case that your claim is denied or it seems to you that the insurer’s estimate does not match the damages, you always have the option of contacting a professional. A public adjuster or even a contractor will likely have dealt with dozens or hundreds of claims. They will be familiar with local statutes that govern insurance estimates and will be happy to send their own estimate to your insurance company. Do not be afraid to look for help, and make sure that you contract with a reputable company.

If you suspect that your roof sustained damages covered by your insurance, we will be happy to do an inspection and advise you through the claims process. Just give us a call and we would be happy to help you out. Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. is a fully licensed (CCC 1325974) and insured, local roofing contractor with decades of experience. If you are interested in roof replacement or repair and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give us a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate! 

Insurance Estimate
Roofing Blog

Should I Share My Insurance Estimate With My Contractor?

If your roof was damaged during a storm, a frequent occurrence around these parts, then you may have turned to your home insurance company for help. After the claim is filed and the adjuster makes his inspection, you receive an estimate from your insurance company that details the repairs that need to be done and how much the insurance carrier will pay for them. At this point you are probably looking into hiring a contractor, and wondering whether you should share that insurance estimate with the roofing contractors that you are looking into. Some people fear that revealing their insurance estimate to contractors may allow a non-reputable contractor to take advantage of them or to raise their prices. So what should be done in this situation? Here are some things you should know:

Believe it or not, most roofers are on your side. Reputable, licensed roofing companies want to do what is best for their customers. Established local companies are looking to make their customers happy to stay in business and get referrals. A good roofer will be able to look at an insurance estimate and determine whether it is a fair representation of what it will take to fix all the damage on the roof. Because good contractors give warranties, they will not do a partial repair just to have to come back again later. 

Roofers can find damage that an adjuster may have missed when surveying the property. The first response you get from the insurance company and the scope of loss that accompanies it is not necessarily the final statement on the claim. Claims can be supplemented by contractors with a second or even third estimate if it is found that further work is required to fully repair the damage and return your property to its pre-storm condition.

There is really no reason that a contractor would use your insurance estimate against you. Reputable contractors will work with you and your insurance company to make sure you are treated fairly. If, however, a contractor asks for an immediate deposit after seeing your estimate, there may be some concerns. In this case it is advisable to get a second or third opinion. You always have the option to choose your contractor and change contractors before you sign a contract. 

Problems on a claim can arise because while the homeowner feels that the insurance company should cover all required repairs and renovations, the goal of the insurance company is to pay out as little as possible. For this reason, every homeowner should hire a reputable contractor who can accurately assess damages and prove to the insurance company that these damages must be covered in the claim. A good roofing contractor will be able to guide you through the claim process, supplement the original insurance response as necessary, and apply all relevant state statutes and building codes so that you are offered a fair assessment of what it will take to repair or replace your roof and get it up to code.

During the claims process, a field adjuster inspects your roof and a desk adjuster decides the payout. They often follow a standard template provided by their company, but not all roofs are the same. Some roofs have features that others lack. Building codes vary by state, county, and city. Codes are also updated every few years. Contractors keep up to date on codes in their local areas because they need their work to pass inspections by city or county officials. Since adjusters are not roof installers, it is important to have a roof contractor review your estimate to make sure that the adjusters did not miss any roof features or roof damages. They will also be able to see if the estimate created by the insurance company takes into account all applicable building codes. 

It is also important that your contractor reviews not just your insurance estimate but also your policy and all relevant documents. Some policies impose time limitations on roofing repairs, some do not include code upgrades, and all policies require mitigation of any further damage. Some policies include Actual Cash Value (ACV) provisions which issue only partial coverage for roof replacement or repairs. A good roofer will be able to foresee any issues that may arise out of the type of coverage you have and advise you properly on what to expect.

At Florida’s Best Roofing we are very knowledgeable about the insurance claims process and how to get a fair and honest estimate from your insurer. We will help guide you through the process. If you have any questions about the condition of your roof or your insurance estimate in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing a call at 386-263-7906!

What Affects Property Market Value?
Roofing Blog

What Affects Property Market Value?

Whether you are considering selling or buying a house it is important to know what factors go into determining a property’s market value. Homeowners love to see their property appreciate in value, and whether selling or not, it is wise for them to take into account how they can affect this. Buyers in the meantime need to know which factors to check when considering purchasing a property, to make sure that it is valued correctly. While values are influenced by the ebb and flow of the real estate market, they are also partially determined by the factors we consider below.

Size and Usable Space

The price of most residential properties, whether a single family house or multiple occupation unit, is calculated by square foot. That is, if a 2,000 square foot home is sold for $200,000.00 then its price per square foot is $150.00. This price per square foot fluctuates according to market conditions and certain aspects of the property. Depending on the conditions referenced below, a price of $150.00 per square foot may be a great deal or a complete ripoff. 

One thing to consider is that price per square foot only applies to what is called usable space. This usable space is the area of the property that is livable and does not include features such as garages, unfinished attics, or unfinished porches/other exterior areas. While a garage may add value to a house, its square footage will not be included in the calculation of the price. In other words, the garage as a feature may raise the price per square foot, but for a 2,000 square foot property with a 450 square foot garage, the price per square foot will still be multiplied by 2,000 and not 2,450. For this reason, it may be beneficial to convert any unfinished areas of a property into usable space before selling. 

 Location

Location is hugely important in bestowing value upon a property. You may have noticed that property values in cities across the country have ballooned in recent years. One of the reasons for this is that as an area gets more urbanized it offers more opportunities for jobs and career development, which draws in potential buyers. As demand then increases, the value of the limited supply rises. On the other hand, if a major employer in an area closes or goes out of business, the property values in the area may drop since the wave of people moving out will raise supply at the same time as demand diminishes. 

Then again, within the same city or town there will likely be districts or areas with higher property values and others with lower. In one area houses may be priced in the millions while just a short distance away they may be less than half of that. There are several factors that affect this. In our area here in Florida one of the biggest such factors is distance to water. Houses with direct beach access are especially pricey as well as those situated on a canal. Other factors include distance to school and school quality, distance to commercial centers, shopping, and recreation. 

The value of a property zoned in a residential area close to great schools and a thriving business community will appreciate faster than others. While these factors are largely outside of homeowner’s control, they are important to consider when buying a property or determining sale value.

Comparable Homes

One way that property value is calculated for a house going on the market is to look at other houses for sale or sold in the area. These are called “comps” and can be helpful, but they must be considered appropriately. Applicable comps must be sold or for sale in the same time period, they must be in the same area, and must feature similarities in architectural style, number of rooms, property acreage, age, and features such as a finished porch or pool. It is usually advisable to consult a real estate agent before determining which comps are applicable. 

Home Condition and Renovations

New and newer homes typically sell for higher prices. This is because as a house ages, certain aspects–like the roof, the electrical system, plumbing, etc–may lose efficacy and need repair or replacement. The current condition of the home is the final factor that we will discuss in relation to value. Critical components of a property can deteriorate over time and must be inspected prior to buying or selling. 

The following should be inspected before a house is appraised to be put on the market: windows and doors, the roof, the HVAC system, and the wood (in case there is any rot or pest damage). If anything is found damaged or lacking, repairs should be done or even full system replacement. Upgrades, such as replacing the roof with higher quality shingles, can even increase a property’s appraised value. Interior renovations, such as painting the walls and replacing flooring can also go a long way. Finally, the property must be made presentable to the eyes of the buyer. A clean and aesthetically pleasing property will sell more quickly and at a higher price. 

While many of the aspects discussed above are outside homeowner’s control, it is important to keep in mind how they affect the price. It is also necessary to take care of the factors that are able to be controlled, such as the condition of a property and its curb appeal. If you have any questions about the condition of your roof or need roof repair or replacement in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

 

The Basics of Flat Roofs
Roofing Blog

What do you know about the Basics of Flat Roofs?

Flat roofs are most commonly found on commercial structures and in urban areas. While no roof should be truly flat, very very low sloped roofs, referred to as flat roofs, are different from the peaked roofs we most often discuss. Because of their low slope, water cannot quite drain as well on its own and special drainage systems must be installed. The materials used for a flat roof also differ from those that are used for peaked roofs. These materials are better able to handle water that does not drain as quickly as it would off of a peaked roof.

Flat roofs are covered with membrane roof systems. Before this is done, however, often a taper system is applied to the roof to ensure positive drainage: that water will drain away and off the roof, instead of pooling on the roof surface. A slope of no less than ¼ inch per foot is recommended for flat roofs. The taper system uses insulation sheets to create a slope carrying water from areas further away toward drains. 

There are several types of drains used for flat roofs. If the roof does not have any sort of boundary around the edges, it can be tapered to drain into gutters (preferably) around the edges. Often, however, flat roofs may have some sort of boundary around the edges which prevent drainage. This is referred to as the perimeter wall or parapet wall. In this case drains must be installed on the roof itself. In this case the water drains through pipes running through the building interior and the roof must be tapered from the edges to the drain. Multiple such drains may be required on larger roofs. 

When a roof with a parapet wall is covered by membrane, the membrane runs across the roof surface and up the wall. The corner between the wall and roof surface is softened with a cant strip. The top of the wall is flashed in such a way that the membrane stays in place and water does not enter beneath the membrane. Parapet walls also require back-up drainage systems, in case the internal drains ever get clogged. These are cut through the parapet walls two inches above the level of the primary drain and are called scuppers. They prevent water accumulating above two inches if the primary drains fail. Otherwise, the roof may collapse from the water weight. Rarely, usually on older roofs, scuppers may be installed at the deck line and act as primary drainage, in which case the roof would be tapered toward them. 

There are two classes of membrane systems: single membrane and multiple-ply membranes. Multi-ply membrane roofs are made of rolled materials bonded with an asphalt bonding agent. These are usually called built up or hot tar roofs. The first layer that sits directly on the roof deck is the base sheet. It must stand up to pulling and tugging forces which may cause wear and tear as the roof decking expands and contracts with temperature and moisture changes. The sheet that is exposed to the elements at the top is called the cap sheet. It must resist the sun and weather. The sheets in the middle between the cap and base are the ply sheets. The number of plys (interior layers) determines the quality and cost of the roof, with more being better and more expensive. Three and five ply systems are common. 

In installation, the base sheet is usually nailed to the roof decking. Adjoining strips are placed so that they overlap at the edges on every level. Hot tar is mopped over and between the plys and cap sheet, which seals the sheets together. Alternatively, in recent years self-sticking membrane sheets have begun to replace the hot tar method in some areas. There are three types of cap sheet. The first type is called mineral, and it is very similar to the coating of asphalt shingles. The second type is called smooth: this is an asphalt flood coat, which must be painted with reflective coating to prevent sun damage. The last type of cap is the aggregate finish where gravel is spread over the flood coat to protect it from the sun. As this gravel can also act as a way of weighing down the roof and holding it in place, it is called ballast. 

Next we discuss single ply membrane roof systems. The two most common are modified bitumen and elastomeric. Both of these must be fastened with screws or nails or adhesive to the roof decking. The finish must resist breakdown from sun and weather. 

Modified bitumen is made of asphalt or coal tar pitch with added plasticizers that make the material flexible. First, a base sheet is placed and fastened. Then, the modified bitumen is laid on top by one of two primary methods: hot mop (SBS) or torch down (APP). The modified bitumen either has a mineral facing or it is unfinished, in which case it must be covered with smooth stone aggregate. A coat of reflective paint is also an option. APP can be painted directly, but SBS needs a flood coat before painting. 

Elastomeric membranes are made from plastic (PVC) or synthetic rubber (EPDM). There are usually three layers that are bonded in a single sheet during the manufacturing process. If not ballasted, they must be mechanically fastened with nails or screws or glued to the decking. If ballasted, these systems are only fastened at the edges and held down by ballast. Adhesive cannot be asphalt or coal tar pitch, as it breaks down the material. Insulation cushions PVC and is covered by a fabric or paper slip sheet to prevent damage as the plastic shifts. Both systems are glued or fastened at the seams. While EPDM uses chemical glue, PVC is heated-welded by a special machine. Smooth stone ballast may be placed on top of either PVC or EPDM systems.

If you have any questions about flat roofs or need any work done on your roof in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

What is Below Shingles on a Roof?
Roofing Blog

Do you want to know what is Below Shingles on a Roof?

When you look at a roof what you notice first is its shape and the material, most often asphalt shingles, that covers it. Upon a closer look you may notice some vents and pipes, but besides that it is really impossible to see what the roof is really made of. Unless you see a roof being replaced or a new roof being installed, you may never know how many layers and types of materials are hidden underneath the shingles and really make up the roof beyond the visible materials.

In fact, there are several layers beneath the shingles that work to create the roof shape, support it, regulate temperature, insulate your home, and block out moisture. Knowing about what really makes up a roof can help you understand how it functions, how it can be damaged or protected, and help you in dealing with roofing issues on your property in the future.

 

Layers Under Roof Covering

Let’s go over the layers that make up a roof, starting from the bottom and heading up.

 

The Frame

The frame of the home is what gives it its shape and defines its boundaries. The frame of the roof creates its shape and the support for all covering material. The frames of modern homes are typically made of a series of wood trusses manufactured to the specifications of a particular blueprint or home design. Occasionally, roofs are built completely on-site with wooden beams cut to appropriate rafter size and put together on the structure. It is important to have an idea of what the finished roof will look like when creating the frame since frames for certain roofing materials, like clay or concrete tile or slate, require additional reinforcing in the frame to hold up their weight. 

 

Insulation

Insulation in a house helps to regulate the internal temperature of a structure and prevent its fluctuations during weather changes. It also aids in reducing the use and cost of heaters and air conditioners. In a finished attic, the insulation is placed between the rafters of the roof’s frame. In an unfinished attic, the insulation can usually be found on the attic floor. 

 

The Roof Deck

The roof deck is nailed on top of the roof frame. It is made of wooden boards, usually either plywood or another engineered wood product such as oriented particle board (OSB). This creates the roof’s surface on top of the trusses. Holes are cut in the roof deck at appropriate areas where roofing vents will eventually be installed.

 

Water Shield

A waterproof barrier or membrane that is designed to prevent build up of moisture or protect areas that are particularly susceptible to water damage is laid down next. This is typically a peel-and-stick membrane that is used to line all valleys on the roof and, in climates that have ice or snow in the winter, the perimeter around the eaves. The peel-and-stick membrane attaches directly to the roof’s deck.

 

Underlayment

Next, and directly below the roof covering, is the underlayment. There are several different kinds of underlayment, which we will go over below since they serve as an integral part of the roof, particularly in preventing water from reaching the roof deck and then causing leaks. Underlayment is usually made of fiberglass paper or felt, and it covers the entire roof. Depending on the type of underlayment, it is either nailed to the deck or sticks directly to it if it is self-adhesive. 

Underlayment is either water-resistant or waterproof. There are three kinds of underlayment: asphalt-saturated felt, non-bitumen synthetic underlayment, or rubberized asphalt underlayment.

 

Asphalt-Saturated Felt

Until about 15-20 years ago, this was the most common kind of underlayment. It is water-resistant and nailed down to the roof. It is commonly called tar or felt paper and can vary in thickness. It consists of a base material (wood, cellulose, polyester, or fiberglass) which is soaked in a protective coat of asphalt (bitumen) or a similar material.

 

Synthetic Underlayment

This is presently the most common type of underlayment used by contractors, although in hurricane-prone central Florida it is quickly being replaced by the hardier rubberized asphalt (discussed below). Compared to felt paper (above) synthetic underlayment has increased durability. Fiberglass is added when the synthetic material is coated in asphalt, resulting in increased resistance to tears and punctures. Still, synthetic underlayment is water-resistant and must be nailed down to the roof deck.

 

Rubberized Asphalt

This is the most expensive type of underlayment, which is presently growing in popularity, although it leads to a higher cost of roof replacement. Its expense comes from a higher amount of rubber and asphalt polymers in production, which contribute to its strength. This underlayment comes with an adhesive on one side. When the covering is peeled away this adhesive sticks directly to the roof deck and creates a waterproof seal, as no nailing is required. It is also called peel-and-seal. 

Once the chosen underlayment is in place, the roof covering is added, beginning with the shingle starter strip and drip-edge at the eaves, the vents and flashing in their designated spaces, and shingles (or other chosen covering material) across the entire roof. 

If you have any questions about roof underlayment or need any work done on your roof in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

Roof Shingles
Roofing Blog

Roof Shingles: What they are and how they’re made

What are they?

Roof shingles are any roof covering that is made up of multiple overlapping elements. The overlap helps to prevent water from rain or snow from penetrating the roof surface. The elements–that is, the shingles–are generally flat rectangular shapes coursing up from the bottom edge of the roof up the slopes to the peak. The successive overlap covers the adjoining locations of the row below, thus preventing water from entering a sloped roof. Shingles can be made of many different materials, including wood, slate or other natural stone, metal, or composite elements, such as asphalt shingles. When the overlapping elements are ceramic or concrete, they are called tiles. Tile roofs are very popular in Europe, but less so in the United States, where the most common material is asphalt shingles. 

 

Asphalt Shingles

Fiberglass-based asphalt shingles are the most common roof covering for residential structures in the United States. This type of shingles are easy and relatively quick to install, they are affordable when compared with other roof coverings, and they can last twenty to fifty years depending on shingle style and climate. Asphalt shingles also come in a large variety of colors, which do not affect the cost, allowing homeowners to customize their roofs to fit their aesthetic.

The waterproofing and protection provided by asphalt shingles mainly results from long-chain petroleum hydrocarbons that are formed in the manufacturing process.

 

How Asphalt Shingles Are Made

Asphalt shingles are made at dedicated shingle manufacturing plants across the country by several different companies. Top tier roofing plants receive thousands of tons of raw and manufactured material daily. The materials are then transformed into high quality roofing materials with increasingly improving durability as the science behind shingle manufacturing continues in advancement.

Asphalt used at these manufacturing facilities is processed to meet strict quality guidelines, resulting in the creation of strong and flexible shapes. Quarried limestone, which arrives at the plants in the form of large stones, is crushed by specialized milling equipment into limestone powder. The limestone powder is mixed with asphalt to create a manufactured material called filled coating.

Fiberglass forms the center base of the shingles. Many thousands of yards of rolled fiberglass is rolled out into a coater where the filled coating is applied to both sides of the fiberglass at super-heated temperatures exceeding four hundred degrees Fahrenheit. Next, the granules–the rough, gritty surface of the shingles–is applied. Granules are created from ceramically coated fine, mined stones that are specifically sized for the process. The ceramic coating on the granules is what gives color to the shingle. Thus, a specific colored coating is selected for each color and style of shingle.

The asphalt coated fiberglass sheet is fed into a press which embeds the ceramically coated and colored granules. Then, the material is passed over a series of rolls while being sprayed with a fine mist of water, which cools down the material and seals the process. A strip of sealant is then added to the sheet to give additional wind protection to the shingles.

Specialized machines at the plants then slice the rolls into individual shingles which are stacked and packed into bundles. The bundles are packed onto palettes then shipped to suppliers’ warehouses across the country.

Whether you have a shingle roof or roofing of any other material, for all your roofing needs in Flagler, Palm Coast, Bunnell, Daytona Beach, and Deland call Florida’s Best Roofing Inc. at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate! 

Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc is a Palm Coast-based roofing contractor, providing professional roofing services in Flagler and Volusia County Areas.

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