(386) 263-7906 floridasbestroofing@gmail.com
What is Below Shingles on a Roof?
Roofing Blog

Do you want to know what is Below Shingles on a Roof?

When you look at a roof what you notice first is its shape and the material, most often asphalt shingles, that covers it. Upon a closer look you may notice some vents and pipes, but besides that it is really impossible to see what the roof is really made of. Unless you see a roof being replaced or a new roof being installed, you may never know how many layers and types of materials are hidden underneath the shingles and really make up the roof beyond the visible materials.

In fact, there are several layers beneath the shingles that work to create the roof shape, support it, regulate temperature, insulate your home, and block out moisture. Knowing about what really makes up a roof can help you understand how it functions, how it can be damaged or protected, and help you in dealing with roofing issues on your property in the future.

 

Layers Under Roof Covering

Let’s go over the layers that make up a roof, starting from the bottom and heading up.

 

The Frame

The frame of the home is what gives it its shape and defines its boundaries. The frame of the roof creates its shape and the support for all covering material. The frames of modern homes are typically made of a series of wood trusses manufactured to the specifications of a particular blueprint or home design. Occasionally, roofs are built completely on-site with wooden beams cut to appropriate rafter size and put together on the structure. It is important to have an idea of what the finished roof will look like when creating the frame since frames for certain roofing materials, like clay or concrete tile or slate, require additional reinforcing in the frame to hold up their weight. 

 

Insulation

Insulation in a house helps to regulate the internal temperature of a structure and prevent its fluctuations during weather changes. It also aids in reducing the use and cost of heaters and air conditioners. In a finished attic, the insulation is placed between the rafters of the roof’s frame. In an unfinished attic, the insulation can usually be found on the attic floor. 

 

The Roof Deck

The roof deck is nailed on top of the roof frame. It is made of wooden boards, usually either plywood or another engineered wood product such as oriented particle board (OSB). This creates the roof’s surface on top of the trusses. Holes are cut in the roof deck at appropriate areas where roofing vents will eventually be installed.

 

Water Shield

A waterproof barrier or membrane that is designed to prevent build up of moisture or protect areas that are particularly susceptible to water damage is laid down next. This is typically a peel-and-stick membrane that is used to line all valleys on the roof and, in climates that have ice or snow in the winter, the perimeter around the eaves. The peel-and-stick membrane attaches directly to the roof’s deck.

 

Underlayment

Next, and directly below the roof covering, is the underlayment. There are several different kinds of underlayment, which we will go over below since they serve as an integral part of the roof, particularly in preventing water from reaching the roof deck and then causing leaks. Underlayment is usually made of fiberglass paper or felt, and it covers the entire roof. Depending on the type of underlayment, it is either nailed to the deck or sticks directly to it if it is self-adhesive. 

Underlayment is either water-resistant or waterproof. There are three kinds of underlayment: asphalt-saturated felt, non-bitumen synthetic underlayment, or rubberized asphalt underlayment.

 

Asphalt-Saturated Felt

Until about 15-20 years ago, this was the most common kind of underlayment. It is water-resistant and nailed down to the roof. It is commonly called tar or felt paper and can vary in thickness. It consists of a base material (wood, cellulose, polyester, or fiberglass) which is soaked in a protective coat of asphalt (bitumen) or a similar material.

 

Synthetic Underlayment

This is presently the most common type of underlayment used by contractors, although in hurricane-prone central Florida it is quickly being replaced by the hardier rubberized asphalt (discussed below). Compared to felt paper (above) synthetic underlayment has increased durability. Fiberglass is added when the synthetic material is coated in asphalt, resulting in increased resistance to tears and punctures. Still, synthetic underlayment is water-resistant and must be nailed down to the roof deck.

 

Rubberized Asphalt

This is the most expensive type of underlayment, which is presently growing in popularity, although it leads to a higher cost of roof replacement. Its expense comes from a higher amount of rubber and asphalt polymers in production, which contribute to its strength. This underlayment comes with an adhesive on one side. When the covering is peeled away this adhesive sticks directly to the roof deck and creates a waterproof seal, as no nailing is required. It is also called peel-and-seal. 

Once the chosen underlayment is in place, the roof covering is added, beginning with the shingle starter strip and drip-edge at the eaves, the vents and flashing in their designated spaces, and shingles (or other chosen covering material) across the entire roof. 

If you have any questions about roof underlayment or need any work done on your roof in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

Roof Shingles
Roofing Blog

Roof Shingles: What they are and how they’re made

What are they?

Roof shingles are any roof covering that is made up of multiple overlapping elements. The overlap helps to prevent water from rain or snow from penetrating the roof surface. The elements–that is, the shingles–are generally flat rectangular shapes coursing up from the bottom edge of the roof up the slopes to the peak. The successive overlap covers the adjoining locations of the row below, thus preventing water from entering a sloped roof. Shingles can be made of many different materials, including wood, slate or other natural stone, metal, or composite elements, such as asphalt shingles. When the overlapping elements are ceramic or concrete, they are called tiles. Tile roofs are very popular in Europe, but less so in the United States, where the most common material is asphalt shingles. 

 

Asphalt Shingles

Fiberglass-based asphalt shingles are the most common roof covering for residential structures in the United States. This type of shingles are easy and relatively quick to install, they are affordable when compared with other roof coverings, and they can last twenty to fifty years depending on shingle style and climate. Asphalt shingles also come in a large variety of colors, which do not affect the cost, allowing homeowners to customize their roofs to fit their aesthetic.

The waterproofing and protection provided by asphalt shingles mainly results from long-chain petroleum hydrocarbons that are formed in the manufacturing process.

 

How Asphalt Shingles Are Made

Asphalt shingles are made at dedicated shingle manufacturing plants across the country by several different companies. Top tier roofing plants receive thousands of tons of raw and manufactured material daily. The materials are then transformed into high quality roofing materials with increasingly improving durability as the science behind shingle manufacturing continues in advancement.

Asphalt used at these manufacturing facilities is processed to meet strict quality guidelines, resulting in the creation of strong and flexible shapes. Quarried limestone, which arrives at the plants in the form of large stones, is crushed by specialized milling equipment into limestone powder. The limestone powder is mixed with asphalt to create a manufactured material called filled coating.

Fiberglass forms the center base of the shingles. Many thousands of yards of rolled fiberglass is rolled out into a coater where the filled coating is applied to both sides of the fiberglass at super-heated temperatures exceeding four hundred degrees Fahrenheit. Next, the granules–the rough, gritty surface of the shingles–is applied. Granules are created from ceramically coated fine, mined stones that are specifically sized for the process. The ceramic coating on the granules is what gives color to the shingle. Thus, a specific colored coating is selected for each color and style of shingle.

The asphalt coated fiberglass sheet is fed into a press which embeds the ceramically coated and colored granules. Then, the material is passed over a series of rolls while being sprayed with a fine mist of water, which cools down the material and seals the process. A strip of sealant is then added to the sheet to give additional wind protection to the shingles.

Specialized machines at the plants then slice the rolls into individual shingles which are stacked and packed into bundles. The bundles are packed onto palettes then shipped to suppliers’ warehouses across the country.

Whether you have a shingle roof or roofing of any other material, for all your roofing needs in Flagler, Palm Coast, Bunnell, Daytona Beach, and Deland call Florida’s Best Roofing Inc. at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate! 

Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc is a Palm Coast-based roofing contractor, providing professional roofing services in Flagler and Volusia County Areas.

Newsletter

We promise not to spam!