(386) 263-7906 floridasbestroofing@gmail.com
Summer Fun: Tales of Roofing Across Time Part III
Roofing Blog

Summer Fun: Tales of Roofing Across Time Part III

Nowadays roofing construction and the roofing business can seem mundane and often quite a hassle for those who have to deal with roof repairs or roof replacement. While that, in fact, may have always been the case throughout history, roofing does play a key role in a few tales across time, from mythological, to historical, to mundane. This is the third post in a series where we will look at interesting ways that roofing has come up in ancient mythology and history while contextualizing these snapshots for those who may not be quite so familiar with tales from antiquity.

 

Bread and Circuses

You may have come across the phrase “bread and circuses” in the past but do you know where it originates? The phrase comes from an ancient Roman author called Juvenal who wrote satire in the form of poetry. Juvenal lived in Rome at the heyday of the Roman Empire at the end of the first century of the current era. He quite often, as much as he could with the government of the time, wrote political satire, criticizing the grandiose lifestyle and expenditures of the Emperor or the declining social and political freedoms in Rome as the Empire grew into itself. “Bread and circuses” refers to the grain dole (bread), which was the free distribution of grain by the emperor to those who qualified (kind of like food stamps). It also refers to entertainment “publically” funded by the emperor (circuses). The reason these are called circuses is that most of them took place at the race track, which the Romans called a circle, or circus in Latin. As part of his societal criticism Juvenal claimed that the Emperor (particularly Domitian) could get away with anything he wanted and retain the support of the people provided that he gave them “bread and circuses.”

 

Ancient Rome

The city at that time was a bustling metropolis with about a million inhabitants and one of, if not the largest, cities in the entire world. With the technological and engineering capabilities of that time putting some limits on infrastructure, Rome was a city of grand houses and villas for the wealthy and at the same time a city of small hovel-like crowded and not always safe apartments for the rest of society, which included the overwhelming majority of Romans. In addition to satirizing Rome’s political climate, Juvenal also commented on everyday life for the average individual in Rome, which gives us a window into what the city looked like, smelt like, and felt like. 

As told by Juvenal, Rome was uncomfortable to live in, to say the least. The majority of Romans lived in apartment blocks made up of buildings several stories tall with multiple apartments on each floor and shared plumbing and kitchen facilities, kind of like a college dormitory. They were also built mainly of wood and fairly close together. This led to hazards such as frequent fire outbreaks, occasional collapse, and very narrow thoroughfares. The living facilities would likely have been cramped, dark, and fairly uncomfortable. Juvenal in describing these sort of accomodations refers to roofs explicitly twice, both in dangerous contexts. First, he says that those with apartments immediately below the roof–on more or less the attic floor–are the safest from fires as those tend to start on the bottom floor where the cooking facilities are. However, this also means they are the last to find out about fire, which poses a danger of its own. Elsewhere, Juvenal says that one of the dangers of walking about the city–in its narrow thoroughfares–is the stuff people dump out of their windows onto the street and, more importantly, the dangers of roofing tiles falling off of the roofs of these multi-story apartment buildings and straight onto the head!

Thankfully, outside of extreme weather circumstances, we are pretty safe in our modern homes both from flying roofing tiles (unlike Pyrrhus from the last post) and from window debris. Reading a text as old as Juvenal’s is fascinating both for the window it gives us into the past and for a renewed appreciation of the present, where tile stays put on roofs.

If you are interested in ancient tales, stay tuned for the next post!

If you have any questions about roofs, we would be happy to help you out. Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. is a fully licensed (CCC 1325974) and insured, local roofing contractor with decades of experience. If you are interested in roof replacement or repair and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give us a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

Shingles: Architectural and 3-Tab
Roofing Blog

Shingles: Architectural and 3-Tab

If you spend as much time looking at roofs while driving around town as we do, (and honestly we imagine that you don’t, but bear with us) you will have noticed that the most common roofing material in our area is asphalt shingles. Now, you might not have known that this is what they were called (unless you’ve been reading our blog!), but undoubtedly you will have seen them, probably every day on your own roof. Shingles, however, do not always look the same, and in this post we are not talking about color. What we are referring to is that some shingle roofs look almost flat, with shingles in a grid-like pattern while others look more three dimensional with a rather checkerboard-like pattern. So, you might wonder, what is the difference between the two? And why are there so many of each intermingled throughout the Flagler Palm Coast area? Well, this post sets out to answer these exact questions.

 

3-Tab Shingles

First, we will go over the asphalt shingles that are laid out in a grid-like pattern and tend to give a roof a relatively flat look. These are called 3-tab shingles in our field, and that is how we will refer to them. 3-tab shingles were the preferred choice of homebuilders and contractors about 15-25 years ago. If you know the history of the Palm Coast area, you know that (roughly) half of the residential properties in the area were built in that time period, prior to the recession. While architectural (also called dimensional or laminated) shingles (the other kind) were available in the late 90s and early 2000s, they were cost prohibitive at the time and rarely used. For this reason, most homes built about 20 years ago have 3-tab shingle roofs. 3-tab shingles are still used occasionally nowadays, but only either at the insistence of the homeowner or if a builder can significantly save on the cost of construction material by using them. 

So, why is that the case? Well, it is because solely from a material cost point of view, 3-tab shingles are the cheaper option. This is due not only to the manufacturing process by which they are created, but mostly also to the fact that a single 3-tab shingle contains less material than an architectural shingle. The question naturally arises then, if 3-tab shingles are cheaper, does that mean that they are worse? And the answer is yes. 3-tab shingles almost always have a lower life expectancy and lower wind tolerance than architectural shingles. These numbers can be significant too. In life expectancy they are usually a decade or more lower than architectural and about 70mph lower in wind resistance. So why are they still around? Like I said above, most 3-tab shingle roofs were installed decades ago, when they were the best and most frequently used option. Nowadays, most new roofs and almost all roof replacements utilize architectural shingles.

 

Architectural Shingles

The other type of shingle is called architectural. You may also see it referred to as (three) dimensional or laminated. These shingles are thicker and are made up of more material, since each shingle is actually several shingles laminated together. When installed they give a roof a three dimensional look and form a somewhat checkerboard like pattern. Architectural shingles have better wind speed ratings (135mph) and higher life expectancy (30-50 years, usually called by manufacturers “limited lifetime”). They are the most common type of shingle in modern roof installations, for obvious reasons. Architectural shingles did exist 20 years ago, but they were cost-prohibitive at the time and only the more expensive homes were built with these types of roofs. 

It is not that architectural shingles are now cheaper or even as cheap as 3-tab shingles, but their price has gone down enough and builders have become familiar enough with them that the material costs and the labor costs involved in installation even out. What we mean by this is that while 3-tab shingles are cheaper in material cost, they rack up higher labor costs since they take more skill and more time to install (essentially because they all must line up exactly on the roof, so roofers must take a lot of time measuring this out). Architectural shingles, while more expensive, are much easier and faster to install. So, what is spent on material is saved on labor. For this reason, in the end, a new architectural shingle roof will cost just as much as a new 3-tab roof, and because architectural shingles are so much better overall, there is practically no reason to ever choose the 3-tab at this point, either for the contractor or the customer.

If you have any questions about roofing shingles, we would be happy to help you out. Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. is a fully licensed (CCC 1325974) and insured, local roofing contractor with decades of experience. If you are interested in roof replacement or repair and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give us a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

Roofing Blog

What is a Supplement?

If you have ever filed a claim with your property insurance company for a loss to your house, such as weather damage to your roof, you will have encountered references to something called a claim supplement in the correspondence with your insurance company. For those of us living in Florida, under a fairly constant threat of storm damage to real estate and other property, it is integral to maintain a current property insurance policy and useful to know how the claims process works, including the language associated with claims, policies, and all related factors. 

While we have addressed other aspects of the claims process in previous posts, this one will deal with an explanation of claim supplements, as they are typically a portion of the claims process that is handled not by the policyholder, but by the policyholder’s contractor. 

Toward what is typically the end of the claims process, anyone who files a claim will receive a document called a settlement letter, which is typically accompanied by an estimate of damages incurred and covered. While this document outlines the amounts granted by the insurance company to the policyholder as well as the method of disbursement, it is not necessarily the final word from the insurer about coverage. This is where the supplement comes in. The settlement letter will have language in it which amounts to the fact that if the policyholder or their contractor disagrees with the insurance company’s estimate, then they are free to file a supplement to the claim with a line-item estimate requesting additional funds. If the request is reasonable and properly filed, it will be taken under consideration by an adjuster and the claim will be re-evaluated. Upon evaluation of the supplement request, the insurer may grant additional funds up to the total amount requested in the supplement, although they may grant less money or none at all if they partially or wholly disagree with the supplement request and the reasons laid out in it.

It remains to explain the reasons behind filing a supplement and the process of doing it. We will tackle the reasoning first. You may think that the idea of a supplement creates a loop-hole of sorts for contractors to receive any additional funds they want from insurance companies. This is far from the truth. There are really only two reasons that a supplement can be filed and successfully go through the approval process resulting in the granting of additional funds. The first is if the insurer’s field adjuster missed some damage that was inflicted by the same peril (storm, for instance) in his or her estimate. While this is fairly rare, it is possible and easily rectifiable. For example, the field examiner might fail to note that a roof leak caused damage to the flooring or fail to see storm damage on the gutters in addition to the roof. In that case the supplement would simply consist of a line-item estimate of the costs of fixing the additional damages as well as photo documentation of the damages’ existence. 

The other reason behind filing an appropriate supplement request has to do with the process of repairs itself. Oftentimes, there exist building code regulations which govern the way that parts of a house (or any other building) are repaired or replaced. While most homeowners are not familiar with the minutiae of building codes, this is not a problem, since it is a contractor’s responsibility to be well-versed in local, federal, and state building codes. For this reason, it is often the contractor who files the supplement when it is based on code requirements. We will illustrate this in two examples. 

For one, did you know that in Florida if a roof repair is large enough it requires, by state code, the replacement of the whole roof? This is generally called the 25% rule. If a claim is filed for wind damage to the roof, and the insurance examiner finds that all the damage is confined to one slope, the insurance company may grant the funds for the replacement of a single slope on the roof. However, it is illegal for a roofing contractor to replace just one slope. Thus, to do the job properly, a contractor will file a supplement for full roof replacement.

Another example has to do with frequent code changes. For instance, starting in January of 2021, Florida requires two layers of synthetic or felt underlayment on each new roof or roof replacement, with the alternative being one layer of peel and seal (a self-adhesive ice/water shielding membrane). If the adjuster is unaware of the new code updates, he or she may grant only enough funds for one layer of felt or synthetic underlayment, in which case the contractor will supplement for the second layer in order to make sure there are enough funds to perform the work up to code. 

Having covered the reasons for filing a supplement, it remains to address the process of doing so. A supplement typically consists of three parts: the estimate for additional funds, the justification behind asking for them, and documentation in support of the justification. Frequently, the estimate must be a line-item estimate detailing each step of the repair process and its cost. The cost must conform to the price lists used by insurance companies, which is why most contractors use the same software as insurance companies to put together their line-item estimates. The justification outlines the reasoning explained above, as appropriate, and the documentation typically consists of photos of additional damages or citations of building codes. Once all required documents are submitted to an insurer’s claims department, a response to the supplement is typically sent to the policyholder within 14 business days.

If you have any questions about roofing supplements, we would be happy to help you out. Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. is a fully licensed (CCC 1325974) and insured, local roofing contractor with decades of experience. If you are interested in roof replacement or repair and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give us a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

Roofing Problems
Roofing Blog

The Most Common Roofing Problems and Leak Causes II

In our last post we provided an explanation of the origins of the most common roofing problems and roof leaks. Turns out that origins of common problems are more extensive that we could exhaust in one post. Consequently, today we return to go over yet more common issues that eventually lead to roofing problems if left unchecked or unnoticed. As always, a timely roof inspection could forestall any such causes before they develop into leaks or other roof damages that may require costly repairs.

 

Nails:

Most of the material covering your roof was fastened there by specialty roofing nails. Although roofing nails are specifically designed to prevent water entry and associated leaks, no system can be perfect. The underlayment layer, whether felt or synthetic, is always attached by nails and so are the shingles, tile, or metal that provide the exterior covering. (Peel and seal underlayment sticks straight to the decking and does not require nails, but it was not in widespread use until only the last few years; even nowadays it is considered an upgrade and comes with extra costs). The first potential issue with nails is installation. If the nails were improperly installed, as when they are driven in too low so that they are not covered by the course of shingles above, they can remain exposed to the weather. Exposed nails begin to quickly rust, especially in the hot, rainy, and humid Florida environment, and rusty nails are prone to failure and water entry as they warp beyond their original form. Even when properly installed, nails can back out or stand high due to continued heat and moisture (again, both common in Florida). When deck nails, the ones installed in the deck sheathing, back out, they can lift the shingles above them, eventually allowing water entry. When shingle nails stand high these are called nail pops and can be easily observed on the surface of the roof. While common, nail pops can be a sign of an aging roof with extensive wear and tear, which may require repair or replacement in the near future.

 

Starter Course

When laying shingles, roofers begin from the bottom by laying down a starter course along the perimeter of the eaves. This starter course serves as a sort of anchor for all the courses laid above it. If a starter course is damaged, then it can cause big problems–rot tends to set in along the eaves and fascia. The soffit on the bottom of the eaves can also show this damage through discoloration. Starter courses can be damaged in a variety of ways from incorrect installation to nail pops to improperly attached gutters that might interfere with the drip edge (a metal strip that bridges the starter course and the eave of the roof). 

 

Ventilation

As we have extensively explained in previous posts, proper attic ventilation is crucial for a well-functioning and long-lasting roofing system. Adequate ventilation occurs when air enters vents located around the eaves of the roof, usually in the soffit, and exits vents located at the top of the roof–ridge or off-ridge vents. Because hot air naturally rises, if this system is properly installed and remains unobstructed, the ventilation system works appropriately. If any of the vents are improperly installed, missing, or obstructed, or if the attic is improperly insulated, the ventilation system may malfunction. This can cause the roof to overheat, damaging the shingles, or moisture to build up in the attic, which can rot the sheathing or the rafters/trusses holding up the roof. Mold and mildew problems often result from lack of proper ventilation and can become a health hazard and significant expense. Animals, such as bats, squirrels, mice, birds, and others can enter the attic and obstruct vents, as well as causing other damages. Any critter infestations are best identified quickly and evicted as soon as possible.

Again, these are only some of the major issues to watch out for to prevent roof damages. If you have not had a roof inspection in a long time, then it may be a good idea to get one now to prevent any future problems. Just give us a call and we would be happy to help you out. Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. is a fully licensed (CCC 1325974) and insured, local roofing contractor with decades of experience. If you are interested in roof replacement or repair and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give us a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate!

Roof Replacement Cost
Roofing Blog

What Determines Roof Replacement Cost?

If you are in the market to replace the roof on your home, you probably have a lot of questions. One of the primary concerns, inevitably, is how much this is going to cost. Homeowners are often unaware of what exactly goes into the process of replacing a roof and what goes into calculating the cost of each project. Before getting an estimate, you may want to find out what factors are considered by contractors when offering a price. This way you will be better informed and able to evaluate the fairness of any given price. Remember, you should always contact reputable and licensed roofing contractors and compare their estimates before agreeing to any contract.

To help you understand how contractors arrive at the number you may see on an estimate, below we detail the factors involved in our calculations of roof replacement.

 

Size of the Roof

The most obvious factor to consider is the size of the roof. You may think that you can get an estimate of your roof’s size based on the square footage of the house, and you are right, but with several caveats. Firstly, the square footage listed on most documents related to the property, and the one used by realtors in making a sale, is the square footage of the living area. This often excludes areas that are under the roof, but are not considered lived-in because they are not connected to the HVAC system of the house. This may include the garage, attic spaces, and screened or unscreened porches. Likewise, for a two story or taller structure the square footage will include all the floors, but the roof often covers only one total floor (although this may differ based on the architecture of the house).

Another element to consider in roof size is the pitch of the roof. Unlike the square footage of the house itself, the square footage of the roof also depends on its slope. The steeper the roof, the greater the difference between the house size and roof size. Roof slope is typically expressed in rise over run. That is, how many inches the roof rises over a 12 inch horizontal run. A 4/12 roof is fairly low sloped, while a 10/12 is very steep. Roofing contractors typically use roofing calculator tables or take hands-on measurements to make these calculations. The final roof size measurement is then expressed in roofing squares. Each roofing square is 100 square feet. For instance, a roof of 2500 square feet would be measured as 25 squares. Once the contractor has this square measurement, they use a per-square rate as a multiplier to calculate the total price. This multiplier includes material, labor, and overhead costs and varies based on the factors below.

 

Materials

The primary factor that affects price is material type. As we have discussed before, tile is more expensive than metal, which in turn is more expensive than shingles. Even in choosing a particular type of tile or metal or shingles there may be price differences. For instance, a higher quality shingle with greater wind resistance may be more expensive than a lower quality type. You should decide which material you want to use for your roof replacement ahead of time, so that any contractor you call can give you an appropriate estimate for that material.

Underlayment, the layer between the decking and the roof covering, also affects cost. Synthetic underlayment is cheaper than peel and seal (ice/water barrier membrane), but the latter is better at waterproofing. An estimate should always specify which underlayment the contractor is offering and may give two different prices (one for synthetic and one for peel and seal) and leave the choice up to the homeowner.

There are also additional materials that go into roof replacement, like metal vents, drip edge, flashing, and nails. These are all included in material costs. Material costs constantly change based on market price, so any estimate will have an expiration date after which the contractor cannot guarantee the given price. This is typically expressed as a period (say 15 days) after the date of the estimate. 

 

Decking

During roof replacement, it is typically necessary to replace some amount of damaged wood decking (plywood or OSB depending on the construction of the house). Because it is impossible to see how much decking needs replacing until the old roof is torn off, contractors include a small amount of decking in the initial estimate and reserve the right to add any additional wood replacement to the final invoice. This should be explicitly stated in any contract you sign for roof replacement.

 

Slope and Shape

The per square multiplier for the roof price also changes based on slope and shape of the roof. A steeper roof is not only larger, but also a more hazardous working environment. For this reason, steeper roofs will have a steeper price since they require special equipment and higher labor costs.

The roof’s shape and how many sub-roofs it has will also alter price. The more “cut-up”  a roof is (the more its shape deviates from a simple single gable design), the higher the price. This is due to the difficulties and the extra material involved with accommodating unusual shapes, which can require specialized labor and a higher waste factor in cutting up material to fit the shape. 

 

Dumping Fees

A roof replacement estimate will also typically involve dumping fees. This is because the materials torn off of the old roof must be disposed of properly. This requires a trailer (rented or owned by the contractor). The trailer must also be emptied at the local municipal waste facility which typically charges for dumping a rate based on the weight of the materials dumped.

So, as you see, there are a multitude of factors that go into estimating roof replacement. If you are interested in roof replacement and you are in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing a call at 386-263-7906 for a free estimate! We will be happy to answer any questions you have about your estimated price.

 

Skylights
Roofing Blog

Skylights: Are They Worth It?

Skylights have become more and more popular as of late. You may have them yourself or seen them in a friend’s or neighbor’s house. They can give the interior of a home a great look with lots of natural light, but what are the real pros and cons of skylights? Below we take a look at the benefits of skylights as well as some of the challenges involved in their installation and maintenance.

 

The Benefits of Skylights

First let us consider the positive side of having one or more skylights installed in a home.

Natural Light: Skylights can bring natural light to areas that are otherwise dark. Rooms like interior bathrooms, which may not have any windows, can benefit from a skylight. A bathroom skylight also brings the advantage of leaving the room unseen from the street. In other cases, large rooms in the house which may have too few windows or whose windows may face out onto an enclosed porch can also be better lit with a skylight or two. 

Aesthetics: Skylights are aesthetically pleasing. They bring brightness and a new atmosphere to the entire room. Natural light is also proven to be beneficial to humans’ physical and mental well-being.

Fresh Air: Venting skylights are available on the market which can provide fresh air to a room, just like any window. Venting can let in a cool breeze in the summer and help lower temperatures in a room. It is important; however, to make sure that the mechanism to open and close the vents is close at hand, since otherwise vents left open when heating or air conditioning is on can lead to energy waste.

Solar: Solar skylights can also provide heating or cooling assistance depending on their location on the roof and the climate in which the building is located. Additionally, east or west facing skylights can provide heating or cooling effects in the morning and evening respectively.

 

The Challenges Associated with Skylights

Expenses: Skylights can be fairly expensive, depending on their size and style, and they will increase the price of future roof replacements. While skylight quality has been going up in recent years, so have their prices. Material price, excluding labor, ranges from about $300 to $1000 depending on elements like size, type, glass quality, safety rating, and so on. Skylight styles also frequently change, which means that the skylight you get now may not have a matching replacement ten or twenty years down the line when it needs replacing. In this case, replacement will require converting the skylight tunnel, which can be quite pricey. 

Roof Leaks: Skylights are a notorious cause of roof leaks. If they are old, improperly sealed, or improperly installed they will cause leaking and interior damages. It is extremely important to make sure before installing that you buy high quality tempered or laminated glass skylights with e-coating to control UV rays and heat. Stay away from cheap skylights which will discover and crack over time. Also, hire a qualified and experienced contractor for installation who will give you a reasonable warranty. Skylights must be installed with a raised trim, proper flashing, and proper sealant to prevent leaks in the future. 

Interior Damages: As mentioned before, skylights have a great potential for causing leaks, which can sometimes get quite severe. These, if not immediately fixed, especially in a rainy environment like central Florida, can cause significant interior damages to ceilings, floors, and furniture. Direct sunlight can also cause damages to certain furniture types and floor types, so it is important that the glass be tinted correctly and that light sensitive items are not placed in direct line to the rays coming through the skylight.

Structural Concerns: Installing skylights on an existing roof, as opposed to concurrently with a new roof installation, can be damaging to the structural integrity of the structure if not done correctly. Roofs constructed of trusses, which is mainly the way houses are built in the Flagler Palm Coast area, must be carefully analyzed and inspected by a structural expert before a plan for installing a skylight is put in place. Compromising the structural integrity of a roof is not only dangerous but also will result in extensive expenses.

Overall, the decision to install skylights must be considered carefully. While the benefits are significant, care must be taken in dealing with the challenges to avoid potential pitfalls. If you have any questions about skylights or want a free estimate for your roof repair or  replacement in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing a call at 386-263-7906!

What Affects Property Market Value?
Roofing Blog

What Affects Property Market Value?

Whether you are considering selling or buying a house it is important to know what factors go into determining a property’s market value. Homeowners love to see their property appreciate in value, and whether selling or not, it is wise for them to take into account how they can affect this. Buyers in the meantime need to know which factors to check when considering purchasing a property, to make sure that it is valued correctly. While values are influenced by the ebb and flow of the real estate market, they are also partially determined by the factors we consider below.

Size and Usable Space

The price of most residential properties, whether a single family house or multiple occupation unit, is calculated by square foot. That is, if a 2,000 square foot home is sold for $200,000.00 then its price per square foot is $150.00. This price per square foot fluctuates according to market conditions and certain aspects of the property. Depending on the conditions referenced below, a price of $150.00 per square foot may be a great deal or a complete ripoff. 

One thing to consider is that price per square foot only applies to what is called usable space. This usable space is the area of the property that is livable and does not include features such as garages, unfinished attics, or unfinished porches/other exterior areas. While a garage may add value to a house, its square footage will not be included in the calculation of the price. In other words, the garage as a feature may raise the price per square foot, but for a 2,000 square foot property with a 450 square foot garage, the price per square foot will still be multiplied by 2,000 and not 2,450. For this reason, it may be beneficial to convert any unfinished areas of a property into usable space before selling. 

 Location

Location is hugely important in bestowing value upon a property. You may have noticed that property values in cities across the country have ballooned in recent years. One of the reasons for this is that as an area gets more urbanized it offers more opportunities for jobs and career development, which draws in potential buyers. As demand then increases, the value of the limited supply rises. On the other hand, if a major employer in an area closes or goes out of business, the property values in the area may drop since the wave of people moving out will raise supply at the same time as demand diminishes. 

Then again, within the same city or town there will likely be districts or areas with higher property values and others with lower. In one area houses may be priced in the millions while just a short distance away they may be less than half of that. There are several factors that affect this. In our area here in Florida one of the biggest such factors is distance to water. Houses with direct beach access are especially pricey as well as those situated on a canal. Other factors include distance to school and school quality, distance to commercial centers, shopping, and recreation. 

The value of a property zoned in a residential area close to great schools and a thriving business community will appreciate faster than others. While these factors are largely outside of homeowner’s control, they are important to consider when buying a property or determining sale value.

Comparable Homes

One way that property value is calculated for a house going on the market is to look at other houses for sale or sold in the area. These are called “comps” and can be helpful, but they must be considered appropriately. Applicable comps must be sold or for sale in the same time period, they must be in the same area, and must feature similarities in architectural style, number of rooms, property acreage, age, and features such as a finished porch or pool. It is usually advisable to consult a real estate agent before determining which comps are applicable. 

Home Condition and Renovations

New and newer homes typically sell for higher prices. This is because as a house ages, certain aspects–like the roof, the electrical system, plumbing, etc–may lose efficacy and need repair or replacement. The current condition of the home is the final factor that we will discuss in relation to value. Critical components of a property can deteriorate over time and must be inspected prior to buying or selling. 

The following should be inspected before a house is appraised to be put on the market: windows and doors, the roof, the HVAC system, and the wood (in case there is any rot or pest damage). If anything is found damaged or lacking, repairs should be done or even full system replacement. Upgrades, such as replacing the roof with higher quality shingles, can even increase a property’s appraised value. Interior renovations, such as painting the walls and replacing flooring can also go a long way. Finally, the property must be made presentable to the eyes of the buyer. A clean and aesthetically pleasing property will sell more quickly and at a higher price. 

While many of the aspects discussed above are outside homeowner’s control, it is important to keep in mind how they affect the price. It is also necessary to take care of the factors that are able to be controlled, such as the condition of a property and its curb appeal. If you have any questions about the condition of your roof or need roof repair or replacement in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

 

Shingle Roof Replacement
Roofing Blog

When Should a Shingle Roof Be Replaced?

Asphalt shingles are the most popular roofing material in our area. They are fairly cheap and durable, providing both protection and aesthetics. Still, nothing lasts forever and it is important to keep an eye on something that is so essential to the integrity of your home or property. At some point, any roof may look worn out, old or show other signs that it is time to replace the asphalt shingles. Here we will tell you what to look out for so that you may avoid problems such as extensive water damage or even mold problems in the future. Take a look below so you may recognize the signs that you should have your roof repaired or inspected:

General Lifespan of Asphalt Shingles

The life expectancy of asphalt shingles varies based on their style or type. All asphalt shingles are made of the same materials, mainly asphalt and crushed fiberglass, but sometimes they are made differently. They vary in the number of layers, how these are arranged, and manufacturers’ specific formulas, which can affect the longevity and durability of the shingles.

Generally, 3-tab shingles, the most common type of shingle in use 10-15 years ago, can last up to 20 years but most often wear down within 10-15 years. Laminate, architectural, or dimensional, shingles generally are given a warranty of 30-50 years. With the appropriate maintenance these generally last between 20-40 years, but this can vary based on weather events, especially in a hurricane and tropical storm prone area. 

Signs That Roof Replacement May Be Necessary

Even taking into account shingle manufacturers’ warranties and the durability of modern roofing materials, there are many reasons that a roof may start to fail prematurely. While regular maintenance is helpful, it is also necessary to look for small signs of trouble before they turn into big problems. Exposure to the elements, like sun, wind, rain, hail, and cycles of freeze and thaw can damage asphalt shingles all at once or over time. Falling debris, such as tree branches, can also inflict damage or wear off granules, as can critters.

You will doubtless notice some wear and tear due to the elements, such as fading colors and the loss of that “new” look. Here are some other signs to watch for in order to forestall leaks before they happen.  

Curling, Cracked, or Torn Shingles

Look out for cracked or torn shingles, or those that are loose and no longer stuck to the roof. These may even be creased. In this state the shingles are no longer a protective barrier on a roof and allow moisture to enter below to the underlayment. While the underlayment–depending on its type–will prevent leaks for a time, repeated and prolonged water saturation of the underlayment will eventually cause rot in the plywood sheathing and leaks in the house. The causes of this are many: bad ventilation, installation errors, weather damage, and others, but the result is always the same.

Missing Granules

Granules are the rough material that covers the top of the asphalt shingles. They are made of crushed stone and are essential to the shingles’ function. They protect against the sun, against water, increase fire safety, and help regulate temperature. Without granules, shingles lose their function leading to higher utility bills and leaks. If you see granules in your gutters or around the downspout, or if you see black spots on your roof where the fiberglass is exposed, you need to replace your shingles.

Moss and Rot

Moss naturally grows in humid environments like those in Florida. You will probably see moss on your roof after a couple of years, especially around vent areas. This does not mean that the roof needs immediate replacement. Often, moss can be removed by qualified professionals who clean roofs. If left to grow unchecked, however, moss can grow in abundance and damage the integrity of the roof by separating the shingles from the underlayment. It can also lead to rot in the wood sheathing. At this point replacement or repairs would be necessary. 

Missing or Blown-off Shingles

Heat can cause nail pops, and shingles can be blown off by strong winds or falling debris. Missing shingles need to be replaced as soon as possible, as this clearly indicates that the roof is now exposed to moisture. This problem is easy to spot, as the areas of missing shingles are most often clearly visible from the ground and sometimes you can even find those shingles in your yard. If you notice this, contact a licensed roofing specialist for a roof repair.

Old Appearance

You will know old roof shingles when you see them—discolored, flattened, smooth, and drab. This not only affects curb appeal, it also endangers your roof. Old shingles cannot do their job efficiently, meaning that every time there is a storm, water could be pooling beneath the old shingles or sitting still.

If your shingles start looking aged, it is time to replace them.

 If you have any questions about the integrity of your shingles or need any work done on your roof in the Palm Coast, Flagler, or Volusia area, please give Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc. a call and schedule a free estimate at 386-263-7906!

Florida’s Best Roofing, Inc is a Palm Coast-based roofing contractor, providing professional roofing services in Flagler and Volusia County Areas.

Newsletter

We promise not to spam!